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Lavender planting

peteSpeteS Posts: 573
Do you think this gravel is suitable for adding to my soil border in order to make it more suitable for growing lavender, or is it too coarse.
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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 6,527
    Gravel that size will have no effect Pete.
    If your soil is heavy/clay this article from the RHS should point you in the right direction
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=620
    About 2/3 of the way down look at-
    Adding grit, sand or gravel to clay soils:

    I've just bought a load of composted bark fines to try and improve heavy soil in my front garden



    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • peteSpeteS Posts: 573
    @Pete.8

    My issue is probably going to be almost the opposite to heavy clay. All the soil in my garden was imported many years ago and added to with compost and manure in the intervening years...so it's loose-ish and rich. But seeing as my local GC have some 'Hidcote' at a very reasonable price at the moment I think I will defy convention and plant some, and see what happens.
  • PerkiPerki Rossendale - LancashirePosts: 1,952
    Golden gravel to big PeteS , the other Pete pointed you in the right direction dig some sand / grit into the area you are planting and plant slightly on a mound if you're worried .
    I should of read more carefully if your soil is imported you've got top soil with added organic matter over the years  which should be ok for lavenders but no harm in added more drainage .
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 6,527
    Your soil sounds and looks good for Lavender Pete.
    Grab some Hidcote and get planting!
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Mr. Vine EyeMr. Vine Eye Posts: 1,448
    edited 1 April
    Is this the letter 'P' club? 

    Petes and Perkis 

    I feel like an interloper. 😅

     Your soil looks fine Pete, my topsoil is much sandier but on top of heavy clay and the lavender does well. Just add a bit of sharp sand when you plant and avoid mulching that area as they prefer poor soil.
  • They also enjoy a light dusting of lime once or twice a year. The main thing to keep them going for several years is to give them their annual haircut as soon as the flowers go over. It looks brutal but cut them back to within 2 or 3 ins of the lowest shoots. This gives them time to develop the following years shoots before the winter weather comes in. Thin soil is essential for them to be really happy, mine self sow into slate chippings quite happily, no soil at all, and the slate is spread over weed matting. I just sit back and let them get on with it.
  • peteSpeteS Posts: 573
    Has anyone tried 'root rocks' A company specialising in selling lavender sell it saying it is perfect for controlling the amount of water reaching each plant and prevents waterlogging!
  • Mr. Vine EyeMr. Vine Eye Posts: 1,448
    edited 1 April
    peteS said:
    Has anyone tried 'root rocks' A company specialising in selling lavender sell it saying it is perfect for controlling the amount of water reaching each plant and prevents waterlogging!
    I’ve seen those. Secret Gardening Club company. I think they’re meant for containers. I wouldn’t use them anyway as they’re just yet more plastic!


    Pete you should do a whole thread that’s just photos of you holding different soils and aggregates in your hand. You’re very good at it! 📸
  • peteSpeteS Posts: 573
    My thoughts exactly @Mr. Vine Eye...maybe...but there again...
    Yes, that's the company. I think their main business is called Lavender World, quite an established family business I think. Good reviews.
  • peteSpeteS Posts: 573
    Finally planted my three 'Hidcote's out today. They are on the edge of the bed, so hopefully the soil is slightly less rich there.
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