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Plant identification help please!

WildliferWildlifer Posts: 52
we we bought our house last year and moved in in November, so it’s a very exciting time with very bare shrubs and “empty’ pots sprouting with growth and new shoots. So I was wondering if any of you can help with early identification of either of these? Both in containers and in a south facing garden.
The first one is the just budding twisty shrub amongst the erysimum and honeysuckle 

thankyou in advance 

Posts

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Posts: 11,384
    I'd guess at the one on the left being a hydrangea and the one on the right might be shoots from the rootstock of something like a grafted Prunus (plum family) where the grafted tree has died-off (the twiggy thing on the right, which looks like it may be dead as there should be visible buds by now.)  Difficult to be sure without seeing the base.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • brackenbracken Posts: 91
    Left one Hydrangea but not sure in other one.
  • WildliferWildlifer Posts: 52
    Here’s the base of the right hand side plant, and the just sprouting plant next to it, no clue what this is either. It’s like the slowest game of surprise ever isn’t it. 


  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Posts: 11,384
    edited March 2021
    I've zoomed-in on the photo and can't see an obvious graft point, so it may have been a standard and the top died-off.  There are shoots from low down and below soil, so whatever it was is now a multi-stemmed bush.  I think I can see a hint of a flower, so see if you like it and if so, cut that dead wood out in about July, just in case it is in the prunus family (to avoid Silver Leaf disease.)  The photo on the right looks like raspberries which have been cut back, so probably an autumn-fruiting variety.  If they don't fruit on the new canes this year, leave them as they will be an early fruiting variety and will fruit next summer.  More waiting, I'm afraid! :D
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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