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Tiered garden

We bought our house a few years ago. The previous owners did a great job of turning the very steep garden into a tiered garden, but there’s a wall they built on the patio area which is massive and not very safe because of how high it is. I’ve wondered about chopping into it to make it into like a big step, then putting plants on the step part. But it’s nice stone so not sure if this would spoil it. Though I suppose that the stone that is removed from the top half would just form the new back wall part of the new step. It would cut into the grass tier above it too but I’m not sure by how much. Maybe 2 or 3 feet. The only other thing I can think of would be to put railings on top but I’m not sure I’d like the look of this. 

Has anybody got any ideas on what we could do? I’ve attached a few photos. We’re definitely replacing the wood fencing with proper railings at some point. And I wondered about building a brick wall in front of the nasty looking concrete wall too. 


Posts

  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,783
    The wall looks very solid and safe, I assume you mean you are concerned about the risk of someone falling over the edge?

    I would plant shrubs along the edge or if worried about children add a fence (and use for climbers) as you seem to have done in one of the pictures.

    Cutting into the land and terracing it further seems like a lot of hard work and makes it unusable imo.
  • When I built ours with my father in law we built them about 18" higher and with planting gaps in the top for sedums etc.
    Maybe you could get someone to build on top of what is there? I'll try and find a pic. Ours drops 25' over 100' 😂

  • This gives the general idea at least.


  • JoeX said:
    The wall looks very solid and safe, I assume you mean you are concerned about the risk of someone falling over the edge?

    I would plant shrubs along the edge or if worried about children add a fence (and use for climbers) as you seem to have done in one of the pictures.

    Cutting into the land and terracing it further seems like a lot of hard work and makes it unusable imo.
    Oh it’s definitely solid! No chance of it falling down. It’s the height that I’m worried about and the face that it’s a drop with nothing to stop anybody from falling.  
  • When I built ours with my father in law we built them about 18" higher and with planting gaps in the top for sedums etc.
    Maybe you could get someone to build on top of what is there? I'll try and find a pic. Ours drops 25' over 100' 😂
    What you’ve done would be perfect for ours. I wish it had been built just a bit higher originally.  Not sure if building above it would stand out because of the different stone work. Maybe I’m overthinking it and could just get a few big rectangle planters to put along the top...
  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 2,507
    You could carry the wheel theme into a fence

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 10,531
    Hello Amy, that is such a lovely wall it would be a shame to spoil it and it wouldn't be as easy as it sounds as there is most probably a 2nd breeze block wall behind it to give it extra strength. We had a similar situation with a 3-4ft breeze block wall right in front of the bedroom windows - it was horrible so when funds allowed I had it demolished and two new walls built but at different levels to make it less in your face.

    In the front garden, I left a more pleasing wall but planted a small box hedge along the top edge to deter the grandchildren from falling over. I suggest you do the same, with either a row of trailing plants to hang down the wall face or a line of small plants/shrubs along the top. If its a sunny area, lavender would look good.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,742
    I think you are worrying unnecessarily.  We have a very steeply tiered garden too, but after 9 years, nobody has come to any harm.  We plant perennials and the odd shrub right up to the edge of each tier.


    If you must do anything, then save yourself the hassle of dismantling part of it, and as JoeX says, plant some shrubs along the edge of it, so that people are not tempted to walk too near the edge.  
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