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What to do with this steep slope?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have a steep slope/bank at side of garden as seen in photo 

I would like to cover the bare look somehow. I’m very much a beginner/novice so not sure how to tackle it. 

My ideal scenario is something that requires little maintenance as it will be difficult to get at. Something that adds colour all year round. Something that’s good to keep away or smoother other weeds. 

There is about 3/4 flat feet between top of slope and roadside fence, it’s hard to see exactly in photo
Is  there something that could be planted on top of slope that grows low and downwards over the slope to eliminate that bare look? 

Any suggestions most welcome 


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Posts

  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,622
    Wow, that is a steep slope.  Ground cover plants don't tend to be that colourful in my experience (you normally need more upright annuals and perennials for that).  Have a look at some of these:

    - Cotoneaster horizontalis (not pretty, but great for birds and bees) and it will hold the soil together as it's roots spread
    - Vinca major/minor
    - Pachysandra (better in shade)
    - Ajuga reptans
    - Hedera helix Goldheart (a nice variegated Ivy)

    I would probably interplant any ground cover with some hardy geraniums, just to add a splash of colour.  Whatever you plant, water it well and regularly for the first year, especially if planted near the top of the slope.
  • Thanks. I suppose I mentioned colour as an ideal solution. It’s not a definite need if something else works. Even if I just got it green. Anything to just take the bare “ugly” look away. Once the trees at bottom grow over time it will help also 
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 805
    There's a steep bank adjoining a road on a journey we take. It is planted with cream variegated ivy and parthenocissus. When the parthenocissus turns red in autumn the colour contrast is very eye catching. I think the plants started at the top of the bank and have grown down but it's very difficult to tell as the whole area is covered with these plants.

    The advantage is they root as they travel, thus anchoring the soil. 
  • There's a steep bank adjoining a road on a journey we take. It is planted with cream variegated ivy and parthenocissus. When the parthenocissus turns red in autumn the colour contrast is very eye catching. I think the plants started at the top of the bank and have grown down but it's very difficult to tell as the whole area is covered with these plants.

    The advantage is they root as they travel, thus anchoring the soil. 
    Thanks for the advice. That sounds like something that would look very well. 
    I don’t mind working at maintaining something but the issue will be access to get at something in middle of the slope. So all advice is very welcome. 
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 805
    I would toy with the idea of just laying a short ladder against the slope and going up a few rungs to get access to the middle. I'm not a health and safety expert but I would drive a few good-sized pegs in to secure it in situ.
  • delskidelski Posts: 274
    BULBS! I think I remember one of the telly gardeners planting up a slope with bulbs.
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 18,423
    I have seen Hypericum Calycinum used on slopes. It has yellow flowers.


    Media gallery  Hypericum online  Garden design Hedges Garden
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,346
    I’ve seen this sort of thing used very successfully on steep slopes https://www.green-tech.co.uk/ground-reinforcement/slope-stabilisation/gtcoir-100-biodegradable-blanket.  but I’ve no idea of the cost involved. 

    Some plant suggestions here
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Balgay.HillBalgay.Hill Posts: 618
    I have a slope, not as steep as yours, and i have it covered with various Phlox subulata. It looks really nice when in full flower, and the colours mingle in vivid mounds of different colours. I've found McDaniels Cushion to be the most vigorous. I think they need plenty of sun though.
    https://www.vanmeuwen.com/p/creeping-fragrant-phlox-collection/70784VM?source=google-prodex&gclid=Cj0KCQiA-aGCBhCwARIsAHDl5x8bcxB8dMpJSyqHTSF4dWTNXEYWCzF_W758-1w2e57HGZkHlT25PxAaAjYjEALw_wcB
    Sunny Dundee
  • Thanks for all the replies, some great advice and options there 
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