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What to do with a narrow strip at front (half gravelled by neighbour)

Hi everyone.  I wonder if anyone has any ideas for planting for a small narrow strip at the side of my drive.  My neighbour have just gravelled their part to make space for another car and left me with the grass, which I think looks awful now.  My idea is just to dig it up and plant small evergreen shrubs and maybe some ground cover or just wood chip.  It also slants towards our drive so will this need levelling or does it matter?  I've Googled to see if I can find any similar pictures for ideas but haven't come across this situation.  My brother suggests artificial grass but not really keen on that.  Any ideas what plants and whether it would look better all in a line or just in small groups. Also what ground cover would you go for?    I'm experienced when it comes to my back garden and it's covered with evergreens and herbs and grasses and looks great, considering I knew nothing about gardening when I first designed it from nothing. 

Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,092
    The first thing to consider is whether anyone ever needs to get in or out of the car on that side. If so, it looks as if you might need something low so that the car doors don't knock it's head off, and also space for people to step out without getting muddy feet or squashing the plants.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,092
    edited March 2021
    Then think about how much sun/shade it gets, including from cars if they're parked for significant parts of the day (and evening in summer), and soil type. If you let us know those things, I'm sure there'll be some suggestions.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,126
    A row of bloody big rocks. Tell them that you have always wanted a rockery. 😊
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,452
    edited March 2021
    I think it wants to be simple, tidy and fairly low. One species in a double staggered row. Maybe one of the low mounding Hebes, I would avoid the ones with garish foliage. If the soil and aspect works, one of the tidier ornamental grasses might work e.g. Pennisetum 'Hameln' or lavender even. (Both of these require a bit more work than a hebe, which would generally stay tidy without much intervention).

    No need to level it.
  • jules 35jules 35 Posts: 7
    JennyJ said:
    Then think about how much sun/shade it gets, including from cars if they're parked for significant parts of the day (and evening in summer), and soil type. If you let us know those things, I'm sure there'll be some suggestions.
    Thanks Jenny - Forgot to mention this.  It gets sun and shade (shade also due to cars at both sides parked nearby) but I've never observed at what times of day as have just ignored that area, so would just go for plants that thrive in sun or shade. I mentioned small evergreens due to not wanting them to get in the way of the drive, but it won't be a problem as I can park further over to the side and I will be getting out of the car on the other side anyway as I don't reverse in.  I don't know the soil type but have never bothered with this in my back garden but would avoid any plant that asks for a specific soil type only.  
  • jules 35jules 35 Posts: 7
    Loxley said:
    I think it wants to be simple, tidy and fairly low. One species in a double staggered row. Maybe one of the low mounding Hebes, I would avoid the ones with garish foliage. If the soil and aspect works, one of the tidier ornamental grasses might work e.g. Pennisetum 'Hameln' or lavender even. (Both of these require a bit more work than a hebe, which would generally stay tidy without much intervention).

    No need to level it.
    Thank Loxley, that's helpful. I had forgotten about Hebes. I have a few in the back garden. Although I love Lavender and the smell would be great, I have had so many different types and they end up looking really straggly or dying. I like the look of the Pennisetum Hameln so will make a note of that.



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