Forum home The potting shed

Help Identifying Tree / Best time to prune

Hi all,

I've recently moved into my first home and whilst excited to start working on our (small) garden, must confess to being a little clueless.

There is a tree at the back of our garden, which appears a bit too large/wild for the size of our garden. Ideally we would like to get this pruned - however want to minimise any risk of infection or causing rapid growth from doing so at the wrong time of year.

Is anyone able to help identify the type of tree from the attached 2 photos (I realise these aren't fantastic)? Further, given the type of tree when would be best to get it pruned.

Many thanks!





Posts

  • delskidelski Posts: 274
    My guess is willow, salix caprea. Without leaves or whatever, it's hard to guess anything else! If it's willow you can prune it now and as hard as you like - they are vigorous. If you cut down to the fence line then you'll get loads of 40cm+ branches straight out from each cut.
  • Dan__2Dan__2 Posts: 3
    edited March 2021
    delski said:
    My guess is willow, salix caprea. Without leaves or whatever, it's hard to guess anything else! If it's willow you can prune it now and as hard as you like - they are vigorous. If you cut down to the fence line then you'll get loads of 40cm+ branches straight out from each cut.
    Thanks - I suspected as much (re: leaves).

    I don't suppose the attached helps much? Just found this from the estate agent photos. I imagine it will be too far away to see much about the leaves.

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,458
    Whatever it is, this tree seems to be growing a) too vigorously and b) too close to the garden fence (and "door"). I would uproot it.
    But probably wiser to just wait a couple of months to see what it looks like with its foliage on.
    PS.- What is the total area of your garden?
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Dan__2Dan__2 Posts: 3
    Papi Jo said:
    Whatever it is, this tree seems to be growing a) too vigorously and b) too close to the garden fence (and "door"). I would uproot it.
    But probably wiser to just wait a couple of months to see what it looks like with its foliage on.
    PS.- What is the total area of your garden?
    Honestly, I tend to agree. The girlfriend is determined to keep it - I'm trying to find alternatives!

    The garden is about 14m x 8m (LxW)
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    edited March 2021
    The bark looks like it could be cherry.  If it is, it will be in flower soon, so I'd suggest waiting until then before deciding.  Some ornamental cherries can look spectacular when in blossom.  Another possibility is Alder.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 2,388
    Looks to me like a grafted tree which I would think might be an ornamental cherry. As @BobTheGardener suggests leave it alone until it shows leaves and blossom.
  • Looking at the massive lesions at the cleft in the trunk - the tree has advanced Phytophthora pathogen infection - it might survive but then again - it might not.
Sign In or Register to comment.