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Small tree/shrub for damp shady border

Afternoon everyone.  Can anyone recommend a small tree or tallish shrub for a damp, shady border approx. 2.5ft in width.   Not too fussy as it’s to obscure a gap in the corner between our conservatory and next door.  Ideally, something pollinators would love.  My garden is cottage style so anything in keeping.  Thanks in advance.  

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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,854
    pyracantha of cotonoeaster might work?
    Devon.
  • Hostafan1 said:
    pyracantha of cotonoeaster might work?
    Thanks Hosta.  I love cotoneaster blossom and I know the bees go mad for it.  Would it grow very tall do you know?  You may have struck gold if they’re  happy in damp shade? 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    There are a few varieties of sarcococca that would be happy there.
    Not really an eye-catcher, but lovely scent from the winter flowers and some have berries

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,373
    Philadelphus?
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Hostafan1 said:
    pyracantha of cotonoeaster might work?
    Sarcococca is very happy in shade.

    I have very serious doubts about Pyracantha in a shady border.
    I fear that it would not berry as well as it would in full sun.

    Below is from RHS site...
    "Pyracantha is suitable for any moderately fertile garden soil in sun or partial shade, including very dry, free-draining soils, and heavy clays, as long as they are not prone to waterlogging. Berrying can be reduced in shady sites, including against north-facing walls."



    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,286
    My next door neighbours have a yellow-berried pyracantha on the front of their north facing house. It's been there for years.
    It's laden with berries every year, but the growth habit is more lax than when grown in the sun.
    There's also an escaped specimen in a field where I walk my dog. It's under trees and surrounded by native shrubs. That was also laden with berries this winter, but the stems were very leggy, but it stood out like a beacon in the winter gloom

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Lizzie27 said:
    Philadelphus?
    Love philadelphus Lizzie but it’s very damp shade .... would it be happy there? 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Posts: 12,373
    I don't see why not. It,'s a tall upright shrub up to 10 ft but easily pruned. Hardy and reliable and would probably appreciate the dampness. You might not get so many flowers as in the sun but worth considering.
    Belle Etoile is one of the best.
    North East Somerset - Clay soil over limestone
  • Philadelphus coronarius 'Aureus' keeps its golden foliage colour best in shade.  It doesn't flower as freely as some of the others but still smells gorgeous.  
    Since 2019 I've lived in east Clare, in the west of Ireland.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,700
    I think Hawthorns fit well in a cottage style garden. Crataegus Laevigata or Crataegus Monogyna can be grown tall or shaped into a shrub.
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