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Trimming the hedge

BarizmoBarizmo Dublin, IrelandPosts: 15
Hi all,

I know this might sound silly. Am I correct saying if I want my hedges to grow taller and thicker I need to trim off the top along the red line I marked? 

It is a case of "cutting back to thicken" the top as it get taller? Is now the time to trim? Is pruning the same as trimming? 

Hope you can advise. 

Regards,

Barry

Posts

  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,166
    @Barizmo  If you want them to grow denser/thicker, then yes, you should cut them shorter.  This will stimulate growth lower down the plant, and make it thicker.  If you want them to grow taller, then don't cut them at the top, leave them until they are the correct height, and then you can trim them several times a year to keep them looking tidy.  The fastest growth rate is usually in Spring, so that is a good time to cut the top, so that they are more dense at the bottom.

    Pruning and trimming are not strictly speaking the same.  Pruning involves cutting specific branches, usually with secateurs, and this is often done to achieve a particular shape to the plant.  Trimming usually involves cutting a large swathe of branches, either with shears or a hedge trimmer.  You can use either method on hedges, however it would be a lot of work to prune your hedges using secateurs.

    Having said that, some plants with larger leaves don't look good when trimmed with shears or a hedge trimmer, as they cut through the middle of the leaf, leaving the other half on the plant, which browns and dies.  To avoid this, some gardeners do prune using secateurs, as that leaves a much neater finish, however requires a lot more work.
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 593
    That looks like the best place to cut it in order to encourage side branching. You could even go another 6-12" lower.

    In terms of when to do it it should be after the fresh new (red) growth has started to turn darker. This is a handy guide produced by a hedging supplier https://hedgexpress.co.uk/blog/pruning-photinia-red-robin#:~:text=Pruning Photinia Red Robin – When&text=Wait until the first of,on to a dull bronze.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,580
    hard to be sure from the photo, but lower down looks fine to me, I'd say cutting where the red line is, would be ok
    Devon.
  • BarizmoBarizmo Dublin, IrelandPosts: 15
    That looks like the best place to cut it in order to encourage side branching. You could even go another 6-12" lower.

    In terms of when to do it it should be after the fresh new (red) growth has started to turn darker. This is a handy guide produced by a hedging supplier https://hedgexpress.co.uk/blog/pruning-photinia-red-robin#:~:text=Pruning Photinia Red Robin – When&text=Wait until the first of,on to a dull bronze.
    Thank you so much for the link. 

    I'm going to let it grow up another 2 feet and trim it from there onward as I want it about 2 feet above the wall for privacy. Think I didn't explain it properly. 
  • BarizmoBarizmo Dublin, IrelandPosts: 15
    @Barizmo  If you want them to grow denser/thicker, then yes, you should cut them shorter.  This will stimulate growth lower down the plant, and make it thicker.  If you want them to grow taller, then don't cut them at the top, leave them until they are the correct height, and then you can trim them several times a year to keep them looking tidy.  The fastest growth rate is usually in Spring, so that is a good time to cut the top, so that they are more dense at the bottom.

    Pruning and trimming are not strictly speaking the same.  Pruning involves cutting specific branches, usually with secateurs, and this is often done to achieve a particular shape to the plant.  Trimming usually involves cutting a large swathe of branches, either with shears or a hedge trimmer.  You can use either method on hedges, however it would be a lot of work to prune your hedges using secateurs.

    Having said that, some plants with larger leaves don't look good when trimmed with shears or a hedge trimmer, as they cut through the middle of the leaf, leaving the other half on the plant, which browns and dies.  To avoid this, some gardeners do prune using secateurs, as that leaves a much neater finish, however requires a lot more work.
    Thanks KeenOnGreen

    Think I didn't explain it properly first time, I want the hedge to be about 2 foot taller and then I will trim it from there on. I want it about 2 feet above the wall level for privacy. 

    Now I know what the different between pruning and trimming thanks to your explanation. 
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