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Garden design plan

tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 234
Hi all,

I need some design advice please. Im getting some of the rear garden lawned and new patio (see colour bits in diagram).

At the moment its looking very blocky. But whatever I try with curving the patio or the woodchip path to hut, the curves dont look right.

What do you think?

Thanks




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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,574
    On paper, I prefer the curves but would move the chipped bark path to make it less imposing.  Something like this:


    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,687
    What about some stepping stones to the hut. They can be informal strips leading to the hut.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,574
    That would work and be easier to keep neat than a chipped bark path, especially if you have blackbirds.  In my last garden they loved tossing the stuff about while they fossicked for insects.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 10,531
    I would advise against Indian sandstone paving next to your veg beds. In our experience it needs constant cleaning to keep it looking nice. If it's at the side of your house and only used by the veg grower, I would save your money and use some cheaper paving slabs.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,574
    I think the slabs are already there @Lizzie27 but, if they're being bought new to replace old ones I would agree  purely on ethical grounds because of the working conditions for the people quarrying it.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • I'm going to suggest a somewhat more radical solution, on the basis that a number of elements on your design are still only on paper rather than actually carried out. It seems odd to me to have your veg beds just where, presumably, you might want to sit out on the newly paved area. Is it for convenient access for the kitchen? If that's all, then you don't need such a large paved area at all.

    How would it be if you moved either the paved area or the veg beds? The space backing against the parking area looks as if its only use currently is for stacking up stuff... (Of course I can't tell where the sun falls, so it may not work). 

    You could, for example, have a planting of ornamental perennials on the far side of the paved area, up to the ditch. This would give you a wonderful view of flowers and later seedheads with the landscape behind, and you could sit on the paving and enjoy a drink there in the evenings. Then the veg beds could go back in the space in front of the parking, along with all the other working parts of the garden (compost heap etc), and the path to the hut would come off the end of the paved bit and would be short and curved. The veg beds /compost bins would then be accessible from the rear side of the paved area, so you get a double benefit.

    It looks as if the ground falls off once you reach the edge of the existing paved area, so it may not be practicable to extend it too far outwards from the house?
  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 234
    What about some stepping stones to the hut. They can be informal strips leading to the hut.
    Yes, I did think about stepping stones. It would certainly solve the problem. I also take @Obelixx point about birds making a mess of it. I can foresee me forever picking bits of bark up from the lawn!
  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 234
    Lizzie27 said:
    I would advise against Indian sandstone paving next to your veg beds. In our experience it needs constant cleaning to keep it looking nice. If it's at the side of your house and only used by the veg grower, I would save your money and use some cheaper paving slabs.
    The landscaper suggested Indian paving because it was a cheap paving option. (Im having to do this on a budget!). What would be a good alternative?
  • tuffnelljohntuffnelljohn DartmoorPosts: 234
    I'm going to suggest a somewhat more radical solution, on the basis that a number of elements on your design are still only on paper rather than actually carried out. It seems odd to me to have your veg beds just where, presumably, you might want to sit out on the newly paved area. Is it for convenient access for the kitchen? If that's all, then you don't need such a large paved area at all.

    How would it be if you moved either the paved area or the veg beds? The space backing against the parking area looks as if its only use currently is for stacking up stuff... (Of course I can't tell where the sun falls, so it may not work). 

    You could, for example, have a planting of ornamental perennials on the far side of the paved area, up to the ditch. This would give you a wonderful view of flowers and later seedheads with the landscape behind, and you could sit on the paving and enjoy a drink there in the evenings. Then the veg beds could go back in the space in front of the parking, along with all the other working parts of the garden (compost heap etc), and the path to the hut would come off the end of the paved bit and would be short and curved. The veg beds /compost bins would then be accessible from the rear side of the paved area, so you get a double benefit.

    It looks as if the ground falls off once you reach the edge of the existing paved area, so it may not be practicable to extend it too far outwards from the house?
    I like youre thinking. Completely re-plan it. It would be nice to have flowers etc by the paved area. Theres also big windows looking out on that bit of the garden. (You cant see from my photos. Perhaps Ill take some more).

    Im going to try and rationalise my 'plan':
    - Last summer was my first growing season as I have recently started growing veg. The bedside window/dining room windows look out on the veg beds. I liked waking up each morning and see how my veg is doing!
    - That bit of garden gets the sun until mid afternoon. The rest of the garden is usually cast in shade from surrounding fences/walls.
    - The large paving area is really just because of the existing hard standing. I dont have any better reason that that! :(
    - I did think about moving the veg beds by the parking space - that would be idea - but its cast in shade nearly all of the day.

    I like your idea of having perennials along by the ditch. What do you think would look nice? (Im on dartmoor, so the microclimate is mostly wet/cold. :) )

    Ill take some more photos later to try and give you some mroe context.

    Thanks for all feedback so far. Very helpful! When its complete (landscaper is booked for March) I will post photos here.

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 7,707
    If you're taking up the slabs that you already have, you could maybe repurpose them for stepping-stone paths and for paths between the raised beds and to access the compost bins.
    I second the idea of wrapping the flower bed round the hut and along the boundary. You could have wispy see-through planting if you don't want to block the view. If your grass area is going to be in the shade, make sure to choose a suitable seed mix.The usual "utility lawn" dwarf rye grass doesn't like shade.
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