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orange trees

can anyone advise me on a good orange tree i could grow in the north west england, i would preferably like one that would go outside in a pot, and if needed i can bring it indoors in winter but i dont have a conservatory or a greenhouse. any reccomendations as i cant find many if any in local garden centres :(

Thanks

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 67,455
    Hi @phillipflynnbL0m0jsp  and welcome to the forum 😊 
    Most UK garden centres don’t stock them because orange trees cannot live outside in the UK, except in a few special locations in the far southwest. 
    They cannot tolerate temperatures below 4C , and really need the shelter of a purpose-built conservatory/orangery
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Soo for example the calamondin in b and q says bring it in winter but ok out for summer? I wanted one that has vibrant looking orange on. Also if they come in i dont have a conservatory or greenhouse but i read some don’t like it inside as to dry etc
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 67,455
    You can keep a small calamondin indoors on a bright windowsill in the winter ... but they are prone to infestations of red spider mite in dry atmospheres so need regular misting and it helps to keep them on a tray of damp gravel while ensuring that their roots don’t stay wet. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I will have a look, to me the calamondin doesent look very orange though in many pics. The seville orange looks great but seems hard to find and expensive
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 67,455
    They’re orange when they’re ripe. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • what about kumquat?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 67,455
    They’re orange when theyre ripe too. 

    Although they can cope with slightly lower temperatures than most citrus, kumquats need a minimum winter temperature of 7C and good light. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Thanks, i think choice is so little so maybe between kumquat and calamondin. 
  • anne353anne353 Posts: 1
    In theory, I should be able to grow citrus because I have an orangery for over-wintering but, so far, results have been poor. I fear our summers have been rather too wet because they've not done well outdoors, slugs & snails have made homes in their pots.  Then, when bringing them in, they gradually deteriorate over winter possibly due to being a little too warm & dry, and the attentions of some Woolly Aphids. To date, I have lost one orange, one lemon and the remaining Lime & lemon are not exactly flourishing. I fear Citrus plants require more attention than I am able to give them.

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