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Can anyone identify these plants?

Hi, we currently have a very plain lawn and want to add a border. I like the mixture of heights, colours and textures in the pictures (not my garden!) 
I was wondering if anyone can identify any of these plants - or perhaps suggest some that would give a similar effect & work well together. We have small children but no pets. 
Thank you  :)
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  • Here’s another one. Sorry I know it’s small, but gives the idea of overall look. I would like some flowers too. 
    Can anyone recommend the best time to create the border? 
    Thanks again. 
  • 1) Fatsia japonica

    2) box ball (Buxus sempervirens) in the grey slate. I think the plant far right is a type of osmanthus - slightly serrated left. The dark green shrub directly behind it is Viburnum davidii. The red-budded small shrub on the left where the slate meets the path is Skimma rubella. The shrub to the right of the skimmia with green leaves and small white flowers is a sarcococca. 

    3) The silver-leaved plants are pittosporum (large) with a trio of euonymus, possibly Euonymus 'Silver Queen' in front.
    Many of these shrubs will grow substantially larger to fill the space. 
  • Hi. I’m wondering if the Box Ball is actually the Japanese Box (Buxus microphylla var. japonica) We have them here in New Zealand and they are easier to grow than Sempervirens in that they don’t get as much box blight. All the best.
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 12,454
    edited February 2021
    Hello Nina :)
    The shrub with reddish coloured "flowers" in the corner of the second photo is a skimmia.
    You can start preparing a border now. Although Autumn is considered the best time for shrub planting, you can plant container grown shrubs at anytime. If you decided to wait until Autumn to get your planting plans organised, you could sow hardy annual seeds in the Spring. This would give you some colour and maybe get your children involved too if they're old enough. 
    If you could give some idea of the border location, sunny, shady etc. that would help with advice. Also a photo or two if possible. 
    Also l would say to make it as big as possible, it looks better and is better for the plants rather than having them squashed together  :)
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,422
    If you go for a Fatsia japonica, bear in mind they can get pretty big. The one in the picture is a little baby one and will outgrow the space between the wall and the path. Mine gets to about 6 to 8 feet tall and that's with taking out a few of the tallest, oldest branches every spring.

    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • K67K67 Posts: 2,507
    Is this or was a show house as developers always plant with no regard to final size. 
    The red grass looking plants are either phormium or cordyline.
    The fatsia is a lovely plant, likes shady spots, (as do the Sarcoccoa and skimmia) all evergreen and will grow up to 10ft x 10ft.
    The plant in the foreground by the light reminds me of a ceonothus but not certain on that.
    There are a few lavender as well, sunny place needed.
  • Thank you all for naming the plants - I’ve made a list so I can search them individually :)
  • K67 said:
    Is this or was a show house as developers always plant with no regard to final size. 
    The red grass looking plants are either phormium or cordyline.
    The fatsia is a lovely plant, likes shady spots, (as do the Sarcoccoa and skimmia) all evergreen and will grow up to 10ft x 10ft.
    The plant in the foreground by the light reminds me of a ceonothus but not certain on that.
    There are a few lavender as well, sunny place needed.
    Yes - these are show homes pictured and ours is a new build. It was finished in July last year and we moved in in October. I hadn’t really thought about final size, so that’s a great point! 
  • JennyJ said:
    If you go for a Fatsia japonica, bear in mind they can get pretty big. The one in the picture is a little baby one and will outgrow the space between the wall and the path. Mine gets to about 6 to 8 feet tall and that's with taking out a few of the tallest, oldest branches every spring.

    Wow! :o Thanks!
  • JessicaSJessicaS Posts: 862
    edited February 2021
    I agree with K67, that foreground one is probably Ceanothus, popular in development planting here too!

    The sort of yellowy green against the wall in third picture looks like Choisya Ternata (sundance maybe?) e.g Mexican orange blossom. Its lovely, scented, pretty white flowers and very popular with insects.  My birds like my big Choisya as they can hide in it!
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