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White powerdey mildu? on pomegranate plant

https://imgur.com/a/EM2MBPy

I have only planted these this year, there in a unheated plastic greenhouse, I am able to take the powerdy stuff off with my finger but it just comes back, I have notced that the the leaves droop the moment they come in contact with it, Im a new gardner so sorry if I have made a mistake!


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  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,021
    Can't see anything in that photo.  Try just using the postcard icon above the answer box to upload a photo - max 2mb.

    It could well be that your plastic greenhouse means poor ventilation which would encourage powdery mildew so make sure you leave it open on mild days but don't forget to close it at night because they don't like to get too cold.

    You don't say where you are but my new pomegranate - planted this November - is deciduous and leafless at the mo here in western France.

    Have a look at this info from the RHS which includes advice on teh correct compost, temperatures, light levels etc - https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/14189/Punica-granatum/Details 
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,317
    I can see the fungus ok.
    As Obelixx says above, it's too damp/wet and there's a lack of airflow that has allowed the fungus to get a hold, but it's not powdery mildew.
    The conditions in your greenhouse are not what the plant needs.
    Basically it's too damp and possibly too cold for you plant so it has become weakened and the fungus taken advantage.
    Where about do you live?

    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Pete.8 said:
    I can see the fungus ok.
    As Obelixx says above, it's too damp/wet and there's a lack of airflow that has allowed the fungus to get a hold, but it's not powdery mildew.
    The conditions in your greenhouse are not what the plant needs.
    Basically it's too damp and possibly too cold for you plant so it has become weakened and the fungus taken advantage.
    Where about do you live?

    I am in south east UK, In the morning I will (try) to do something about the damp but as its a plastic greenhouse im not entirly sure what to do about it, Im not sure about too cold as all the reserch I have done (which is all very conflicting) has said that it can take up to -7 but we havent hit that here, I will also leave the greenhouse half way open in the morning to see what happens, thanks!
     
  • Obelixx said:
    Can't see anything in that photo.  Try just using the postcard icon above the answer box to upload a photo - max 2mb.

    It could well be that your plastic greenhouse means poor ventilation which would encourage powdery mildew so make sure you leave it open on mild days but don't forget to close it at night because they don't like to get too cold.

    You don't say where you are but my new pomegranate - planted this November - is deciduous and leafless at the mo here in western France.

    Have a look at this info from the RHS which includes advice on teh correct compost, temperatures, light levels etc - https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/14189/Punica-granatum/Details 

    I have 15 pomegranet (baby) plants and 10 are leafless, not sure why the rest have kept there leaves but they have been a bit strange from the begining, Im in south east england, I will leave the greenhouse open in the mornings now and hopefully that will help, out of curiosty would putting any fungiside on the plants help?

    Thanks!

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Posts: 11,317
    I'd bring them indoors for the time being.
    They are young plants and are not ready to survive the great outdoors just yet.
    Bring them in and let them warm up and dry out a bit somewhere that gets good light.
    Trim off the bits that are badly affected.
    No point in using fungicide (especially on such young plants), you need to improve the conditions for your plants and they will shrug off the fungus.


    Billericay - Essex

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,895
    The plastic greenhouses are pretty useless for your requirements I'm afraid.
    They tend to create a damp environment, and don't really offer anything other than protection from rain/wind. They don't have the kind of insulation a proper greenhouse has. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,021
    edited January 2021
    You don't need fancy chemical fungicides to treat small problems but you do need to sort out humidity and ventilation first.

    Try sprinkling a light dose of ground cinnamon on the surface of the compost and over the remaining foliage once you have removed the worst affected.  I haven't tried this yet my self but am planning to use it on trays of seed compost this spring as some crops are more prone to damping off, a fungae that kills seedlings.  

    Another remedy I've just read about but not yet tried is to spray with chamomile tea. 1/2 cup of chamomile flower heads to 2 cups of boiling water.  Leave to steep till cooled then strain and use as a spray.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Pete.8 said:
    I'd bring them indoors for the time being.
    They are young plants and are not ready to survive the great outdoors just yet.
    Bring them in and let them warm up and dry out a bit somewhere that gets good light.
    Trim off the bits that are badly affected.
    No point in using fungicide (especially on such young plants), you need to improve the conditions for your plants and they will shrug off the fungus.


    AH okay, this is all really helpful, ive taken a few inside and I put them under some plant growing led lights and hopefully that will help, ive taken off all the white fungs I can find but im sure if I did a good enough job, I also left the greenhouse open all day so hopfully something would have happend.

    I can only hope for the best! some of the plants do have a small ammount of buds on them so I hope that means good things for the future!

    Thanks!
  • AdamLp7Gy4b5AdamLp7Gy4b5 Posts: 20
    edited January 2021
    Obelixx said:
    You don't need fancy chemical fungicides to treat small problems but you do need to sort out humidity and ventilation first.

    Try sprinkling a light dose of ground cinnamon on the surface of the compost and over the remaining foliage once you have removed the worst affected.  I haven't tried this yet my self but am planning to use it on trays of seed compost this spring as some crops are more prone to damping off, a fungae that kills seedlings.  

    Another remedy I've just read about but not yet tried is to spray with chamomile tea. 1/2 cup of chamomile flower heads to 2 cups of boiling water.  Leave to steep till cooled then strain and use as a spray.

    okay I will give this a go, I have brought a glass greenhouse but it will take upto 18 weeks! to come :(, I Will have to try both those methords soon! at the moment anything people suggest as im trying to cover all my bases!, I have tried to airate the greenhouse today and I will do that for the next week or so! Thank you for all your help!
  • Fairygirl said:
    The plastic greenhouses are pretty useless for your requirements I'm afraid.
    They tend to create a damp environment, and don't really offer anything other than protection from rain/wind. They don't have the kind of insulation a proper greenhouse has. 

    I have recently brought myself a glass greenhouse that has a a window and all the rest, but Ive only brought it a week ago and they take upto 18 weeks to come :( but hopefully once I get it next winter I wont have this issue! Thanks
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