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What can I plant against this north facing fence?



My aim is make the garden appear more private and the fence look  more interesting throughout the year. The border is quite narrow but could be widened a little. Something fast growing would be preferred.  Ideas welcomed.
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  • B3B3 Posts: 21,410
    I would have clematis and climbing roses with something lower in front .
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,547
    There are various ideas here
    https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/climbers-to-grow-in-shade/
    I would definitely widen the border  :)
  • Fruit bushes such as blackerrries, gooseberries, there are quite a few fruit bushes that will do well in shade, they will be less sweet and more acidic but still good and could make jam etc from them.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,092
    edited January 2021

    What can I plant against this north facing fence?






    Just a word of caution. The short concrete posts indicate the official boundary.

    The fence is actually within your neighbour’s garden and belongs to them.

    Do they know that you intend to possibly attach plants or supports to their property, with the long term possibility of bringing their fence down?

    It might be an idea to have a chat with them before you begin any work.

    Or did you mean “What can I plant in front of this fence?
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 262
    You'll probably find that there is no precise boundary line. And I presume you don't intend to plant something which you'll then ignore to the point that it risks pulling down your boundary fence anyway. It's as much to your benefit as it is to your neighbour's.

    Pyracantha. Berries in shade. Controllable vigour. Lovely.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,092
    I have been through it, Astraeus.  

    As the one time owner of a fence which a neighbour used as a washing line holder, a large bouncing dog retainer, and a plant support.

    Believe me, I was not well disposed to my neighbours. 

    If people want to grow things up fences then they should supply their own.

    Concrete posts such as the ones in the photo are generally accepted as marking boundaries, in England at least.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 262
    OK. I'm only a disputes lawyer with heaps of experience of litigating boundary disputes. I'll defer to those who know more.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,092
    edited January 2021
    Your experience is undoubtedly professional, but I know that seeking your professional advice is to be avoided if there is ever going to be the prospect of a sale questionnaire asking “and have there been any disputes with your neighbours?”

    Best not to rile the neighbours in the first place has been my experience, hence my comments above.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • AstraeusAstraeus Posts: 262
    I only mention it so that the OP knows to pay little heed to nonsense such as that concrete posts form an 'official' boundary between sites. The OP asked for help on planting. She is perfectly entitled to plant against the fence. @AnniD and @koyukano responded in kind. The OP doesn't need to be misinformed as to what she can and cannot do against a boundary fence.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,092
    edited January 2021
    I’m losing the will to live. 🙄

    And please don’t anyone go analysing that literally.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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