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Large North East Garden, will we get sun

Hi! We are looking to purchase this house. It is a perfect 5 bedroom house for our family. I’m a bit nervous as I love my sun. I would never normally consider a north east garden...however I wonder if this garden with the gaps at the side and no overlooking houses, whether we would still get good sun. It is plot 771 


Posts

  • PerkiPerki Rossendale - LancashirePosts: 2,287
    I can't see why you wouldn't get a good amount of sun. My house is similar front door south facing , yes directly behind the house it doesn't get direct sunlight after dinner but more than two thirds of the rear garden gets plenty of sunlight. If I were to put a seating area I be putting it up near the fence 772 plot possible where abouts it kinks in ( or bit more to left ), should get morning - afternoon and evening sunlight . I suppose it depend on how tall the house is as well and how for back the garden goes to the fence. 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 10,503
    Yes, I think so too, as well as east and west sun as it moves round.
  • Perki said:
    I can't see why you wouldn't get a good amount of sun. My house is similar front door south facing , yes directly behind the house it doesn't get direct sunlight after dinner but more than two thirds of the rear garden gets plenty of sunlight. If I were to put a seating area I be putting it up near the fence 772 plot possible where abouts it kinks in ( or bit more to left ), should get morning - afternoon and evening sunlight . I suppose it depend on how tall the house is as well and how for back the garden goes to the fence. 
    Thank you for your reply! It’s really appreciated. Yes my thoughts are that technically to the left of the house you would get all the evening sun. Just feels such a gamble as this would potentially be our forever home 
  • Try https://www.suncalc.org to get an idea of where the sun will be at any given time of year, you can drag it right on top of the house if you want to be precise. And if you enter the height of an object (e.g. the house or a wall) it'll show you how long a shadow it'll cast at any given time.
  • Lizzie27 said:
    Yes, I think so too, as well as east and west sun as it moves round.
    Thanks Lizzie, really appreciate your comment. Would the house always have a shadow do you think or in mid summer would there be full sun in the garden. 
  • I think it depends on the length of your proposed new garden. There will always be some shade cast in some area of the garden given it has buildings (your house and garage) south of it. It depends on whether it is a 2 storey or 3 storey house also as a 3 storey would obviously shade out more of the garden.

    In the summer months when most people spend time in the garden the sun would be high and I'd say the majority of that garden would be in sun throughout the whole day. In winter the sun is lower and so your house and garage would likely cause shade over parts of your garden up to the back fence. In the spring aurum you would get something in between. 

    I think I would be reasonably happy with it, the garage would have minimal affect as it is quite low so would only really cast shade in the winter months. The rest of the garden you would get a decent amount of sunlight with there being a shaded area which would start in the morning at the left side of the garden and move across to the east side in the evening but there would always be sunlight somewhere in that garden for you to lounge in and a bit of shade can be nice sometimes! 
  • TallyVTallyV OxfordshirePosts: 9
    We’re in a north east facing detached new build. We have beds across the back and side fence (south and west facing). We have a patio by the patio door that gets the sun until mid-late morning and another in the southerly corner that gets sun into the evening.

    The balance of sun works well for us during the summer. I have foxgloves and hydrangeas etc - those in my side bed that prefer some shade. 
    Also we have a good plot, and the house we want. The same house as ours that was south east facing had other disadvantages and cost more (and wasn’t available at the right time). 

    It being north east facing was the compromise - if you call it a compromise so we consider ourselves lucky.  

    This photo was in the morning in may last year 

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