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Holly Tree

edited December 2020 in Plants
Hi i have a Holly tree thats arrived in a 9cm pot its a baby only 30cm tall. I got it out and it wont stand on its own it topples :/:( i dont know wot to do.. i want to grow in a pot. How long can it generally stay in this size pot? How often will it need watering being a newbie etc? Wot soil should i use as well? Thank you!

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  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    A 9cm pot is tiny, so if there's a lot of root and not much soil [pot bound] it would be worth putting it into a slightly larger pot. Something only an inch or two [3 - 5 cm] bigger to give it some more room. It won't do much growing now, but it'll allow it to get it's root system settled in over winter, and it won't then need much attention. They're slow growing, but you will need to pot it on as it grows, and amend the soil each year to keep it healthy, using a slow release food or similar too, and keeping on top of watering in dry, hot weather. 
    Ideally, a soil based medium is what you'd use if it's going to stay in a pot - they're available from GCs.  John Innes is what you'd look for, and just choose an appropriate one. However, if you can 't get that, any multi purpose compost would do for the winter. It will barely need watering as the weather conditions will help with that.  Just keep it somewhere that you can keep an eye on it, especially if rough weather topples it :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Thank so much for your comment! :)
    Im looking at the John Innes compost and there are soo many available :/ can you help with which is best for Holly generally / long term etc cause im at a loss. A newbie totally!
  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    It's not something I use, but either 2 or 3 - that's suitable for shrubs and potting on. Either of those will do  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Thanks so much
  • If you can find a clay pot for it, that would be heavier so it would be less likely to topple over.   :)
    Since 2019 I've lived in east Clare, in the west of Ireland.
  • Fairygirl said:
    It's not something I use, but either 2 or 3 - that's suitable for shrubs and potting on. Either of those will do  :)
    Yes, either of those will be fine 😊 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • FairygirlFairygirl Posts: 54,754
    You're welcome. :)
    Just make sure the rootball is nicely dampened before you repot, and any roots that look very tight and solid ]pot bound] are teased out a bit. Then water afterwards.
    If a plant is dried out when it's repotted, the water doesn't always penetrate all the compost, and runs through instead, and the roots remain dry. 
    If you're unsure, you can post a photo of the rootball, and we can advise as to whether it's pot bound or not.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....



    I live in west central Scotland - not where that photo is...
  • Fairygirl said:
    A 9cm pot is tiny, so if there's a lot of root and not much soil [pot bound] it would be worth putting it into a slightly larger pot. Something only an inch or two [3 - 5 cm] bigger to give it some more room. It won't do much growing now, but it'll allow it to get it's root system settled in over winter, and it won't then need much attention. They're slow growing, but you will need to pot it on as it grows, and amend the soil each year to keep it healthy, using a slow release food or similar too, and keeping on top of watering in dry, hot weather. 
    Ideally, a soil based medium is what you'd use if it's going to stay in a pot - they're available from GCs.  John Innes is what you'd look for, and just choose an appropriate one. However, if you can 't get that, any multi purpose compost would do for the winter. It will barely need watering as the weather conditions will help with that.  Just keep it somewhere that you can keep an eye on it, especially if rough weather topples it :)
    Hi would this compost be ok?
    https://www.argos.co.uk/product/8882567?clickSR=slp:term:compost:1:7:1
    Thank you
    To add one of the trees has a stake to support it the other doesnt? Guessing its ok without one?

    When i transfer to its long term bigger pot. Which i want to do asap if possible.and ok to do so? I thoroughly wet all the new soil and the current soil its in? Thanks again :)
  • JennyJJennyJ Posts: 10,417
    To soak the rootball, get a bucket of water, submerge the rootball (in its pot) and hold it under the surface until air bubbles stop rising and it stays underwater when you let go. Then let it drain a while before you plant it in its new pot.  Don't soak the fresh compost before you use it, but give the whole thing a good watering afterwards. You can add a stake if you think it needs one (for example if the main shoot isn't vertical and you want it to be).
    Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Soil type: sandy, well-drained
  • Hi would this compost be ok?
    Any compost that's for general use is not soil based which is what you need to keep a plant permanently in a pot. This is the one you need: https://www.diy.com/departments/westland-john-innes-no-2-pots-planters-compost-35l/5023377007538_BQ.prd 

    Other brands are available but look out for John Innes 2 or 3 indication on the packaging. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
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