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Ivy problem

Hi all, I have a problem! 2 dead tree trunks about 6 foot tall with ivy entwining and growing a massive Pom Pom on the top. Trees now very wobbly and ivy running alongside the fence behind. It has been full of visiting birds, in flower so good for insects etc. Hubby want to grub out which leaves a massive wall on view from next door and I am not sure. The ivy is becoming a pest. 2 options take off the top knot which is very heavy now or grub out the lot including the ivy of course. Replace with a modest pretty tree. Opinions welcome! 🧤🌳
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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 65,487
    Can you show us some photos please?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    I have a similar situation:  I had a row of gloomy conifers cut down to the height of the fence behind them, and planted a different variety of ivy on each.  They have now reached the stage you describe.

    You can cut off the top knot and leave the ivy covering the trunks.  Ivy can damage fences, by pushing between the slats, and then as it grows, the stems get fatter and force the slats apart. So it would probably be best to keep it off the fence.  I find a wallpaper scraper works well.  If you have, or can borrow, an electric hedge trimmer, you can pass it between the tree trunk and the fence, and then the ivy on the fence will die and you can remove it at your leisure.  The ivy will keep on growing, so if you decide to keep it, you'll need to trim it every year.
  • I will pop out and get some
  • josusa47 said:
    I have a similar situation:  I had a row of gloomy conifers cut down to the height of the fence behind them, and planted a different variety of ivy on each.  They have now reached the stage you describe.

    You can cut off the top knot and leave the ivy covering the trunks.  Ivy can damage fences, by pushing between the slats, and then as it grows, the stems get fatter and force the slats apart. So it would probably be best to keep it off the fence.  I find a wallpaper scraper works well.  If you have, or can borrow, an electric hedge trimmer, you can pass it between the tree trunk and the fence, and then the ivy on the fence will die and you can remove it at your leisure.  The ivy will keep on growing, so if you decide to keep it, you'll need to trim it every year.
    We feel if we cut the ones that are on the fence that the trees will possibly fall down anyway! 

  • They are loose like toothy pegs that are on this way out! 
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    Golly gosh, they're a lot bigger than mine!  You need to do something, and soon, because those top-heavy trunks could come down in a high wind, damaging your own and/or your neighbour's property.  Given the scale of the problem, it might be better to call in a tree surgeon rather than try to tackle it yourselves.
  • stephentamestephentame Southwest EnglandPosts: 61
    I'd be tempted to cut it down to about head height to keep it in hand and avoid trouble from it falling, enjoy the environmental benefits for at least another of years, then revisit it in 2023 to see if you're still happy or want to replace it
  • I'd say take it down and start again, starting by cutting through the main stem(s) at ground level and letting it run down for a season before removing what is left.

    But you could reproduce the Yeovil Plum Duff Bush for Christmas to cheer up the street.


    “Rivers know this ... we will get there in the end.”
  • That surely has to be one of the worst cases of Christmas excess in a garden  :D
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