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Shrub inspiration please

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  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    I have finally made my mind up, well sort of, I have decided there is room for two shrubs in this gap (just couldn't decide between two plants). I am sure it is an age old problem for gardeners. Anyway, having decided that Enkianthus cernuus rubens, thank you @AnniD and @Silver surfer and also a Euonymus alatus, thank you @Dovefromabove I am struggling to procure said plants here in France. I am however, very tenacious so I will keep you posted. 

    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,798
    Just to repeat myself....
    Enkianthus cernuus rubens is extremely rare and not easy to obtain.
    We ended up buying several labelled as that, that turned out to be the ordinary, yet beautiful Enkianthus campanulatus.

    Euonymus alatus should be much easier to find.
    A shrub that gives stunning autumn colour here in UK.
    No idea how it will cope with the hotter weather in the Dordogne.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 608
    At the moment I am researching trees and sub shrubs to be planted on our village green due to ash trees having to be felled because of ash die back. 
    I am looking at native trees/sub shrubs for flower, fruit, insect and bird friendly and autumn colour which do not grow too tall or require constant maintance.
    How about a guelder rose, viburnum lantana or dogwood in your garden?
    I have so far made a "short" list of 10 plants for the committee to consider as I have offered to cover the cost of the trees. I am hoping to get a discount from a local nursery for bare rooted plants. So far I have Aspen, Sorbus aucuparia, Crab apple, Field Maple, Spindle Tree, Rowan, Viburnum lantana and Red Oak  on my list. It would be lovely to have some of each, should look spectacular in a good autumn. Sadly there are a lot of ash trees on the site which all have signs of die back, those which could be dangerous with dead branches falling off are going first but the rest are being monitored.
    @Joyce Goldenlily I wouldn't plant aspen, Populus tremula, they sucker like mad and when you cut them down it exacerbates the problem. They are in our woodland and where they grow nothing else can establish.
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    You are not wrong @Silver surfer:lol:
    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    Just to repeat myself....
    Enkianthus cernuus rubens is extremely rare and not easy to obtain.

    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,798
    Been thinking....
    I am not sure how plants that thrive here in cool, wet UK and Scotland will cope with your situation/temps etc.
    Enkianthus likes moist soil, shade, semi shade, cool temperatures.
    Euonymus alatus I fear the heat will cause the leaves to drop very quickly and autumn colours which here last for a long time may be a disappointment for you.

    Might I suggest you spend the spring/summer looking at plants in the gardens near you.
    See what grows well.
    See what you like....then buy the some.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    Thank you for your advice @Silver surfer. I have done a bit more research and I do think they might be ok. We are in the very north of the Dordogne and it is a lovely sheltered spot with plenty of shade at the hottest time of day. We do get very hot days, 40 degrees but not usually for long periods, it is usually late 2o's early 30's for most of summer. The ground where they will go is also quite damp, a stream runs into a lake just behind this area. 

    I was a bit concerned that one website noted the Euonymus is a bit invasive, certainly something I don't want, but hopefully with limited space that won't happen. 

    The biggest problem at the moment is finding either of them at a reasonable price/size.

    Btw, I don't have neighbours with gardens, they are all farmers with fields. Even in town the French don't really get too involved with gardening as we do, not around here anyway, it's mostly roses and photonia hedges. 
    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,798


    I was a bit concerned that one website noted the Euonymus is a bit invasive, certainly something I don't want, but hopefully with limited space that won't happen. 


    Euonymus alatus is not the least bit invasive here.
    Perfectly well behaved.
    I have a thing for Euonymus and collected many sp. (like other people collect stamps.)
    I cannot think of any that are a problem in UK.

    Many plants are fine in UK but can be a problem in other counties. eg Quote from www.

    "Euonymus fortunei has been reported to be invasive in natural areas in most of the states in the eastern half of the U.S. It can tolerate a broad range of environmental conditions ranging from full sun to deep shade, and acidic to basic and low nutrient soils, but it does not grow well in heavy wet soils."

    Another example is Japanese knot weed...perfectly behaved in Japan...brought here by the Victorians, it is now an dreadful, invasive pest in UK.

    So when doing research on www you have to read past the headlines.
    Check where they are talking about.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    Thank you @Silver surfer

    I managed a walk around my local (small) GC today, they did have lots of Euonymus but not the one recommended.

    Hopefully with spring around the corner more will become available. 
    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, Haute Vienne/Dordogne border. FrancePosts: 2,814
    One shrub I did notice a lot of in my local GC was Nandina. I took that as a good sign it would survive here. If Enkianthus turns out to be too tricky to get hold of, the one I found is 52.50€ so a bit pricy for me too, I thought the Nandina sounded interesting. Anyone any experience of them? 
    "To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul." — Alfred Austin
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