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Shrub inspiration please

D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, FrancePosts: 2,531
I've cleared an area of the garden that had become overrun with brambles and nettles and to a certain extent bamboo. Unfortunately a couple of the shrubs/climbing rose that were underneath it all have died leaving a rather large gap in the planting. 

I'm looking for inspiration to fill the gap. 

It's on the edge of the garden and more or less serves as a screen to the fields behind. To the right of the gap is the bamboo, only a smallish light one and is containable, I've given it a very good haircut today. Along from that is an Hibiscus, Weigela, Rhododendron, a small acer and a variegated Euonymus. To the left is a large Camellia and a large Pampas grass. 

Behind this 'screening' is a large hedge made up of laurels and conifer. This is quite high ( for the moment) and causes the screen to be in a lot of shadow. It is north facing and although the soil is very rich it does stay very damp, probably because it doesn't get much light. We have hot summers, but this is a shady spot, short but sometimes cold winters -8 some nights, but again it's a sheltered spot. 

I'd like to have something that flowers. It needs to be fairly low maintenance and also not take over the space. I could see a Hydrangea working well there but I've several of those already and would like something a bit different. 

Any ideas anyone? Appreciate all suggestions. Thank you. 
Gardeners, I think, dream bigger dreams than emperors. – Mary Cantwell

Posts

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 14,997
    There are lots of different sorts of hydrangea, though. I can only think of Deutzia and Kerria Japonica. Kolkwitzia will grow in partial shade. Mine has survived in Dordogne in partial shade for 25 years. There are more shrubs for shade that don't flower.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,055
    I had thought of Daphne, but although they like moist soil they need good drainage. Not sure if they would be suitable? 
  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, FrancePosts: 2,531
    Thank you both for your ideas. I think Daphne might struggle, I did have two but lost one for no apparent reason and the other one isn't too happy. I know they can be short-lived, but beautiful, especially the fragrance. 

    I've also got a Kerriia already, which is fine where it is but does spread a lot if not kept in check. I think the yellow would be out of place too in this particular spot. 

    I like the look of the Deutzia. 

    Keep the ideas coming. 🙂
    Gardeners, I think, dream bigger dreams than emperors. – Mary Cantwell
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,152
    Pieris will be fine if you have rhodos and camellias. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,055
    A friend of mine has an ekianthus which looks stunning in Autumn and very pretty. There a several varieties but a search makes me think it's this one
    https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/enkianthus-cernuus-f-rubens/
    Although it doesn't say North facing is suitable 🙄, l would put a bet on it being in that location,  maybe North East at a pinch. 
    Still not quite awake yet, l will keep thinking and send her an email later if you're interested  :)
  • At the moment I am researching trees and sub shrubs to be planted on our village green due to ash trees having to be felled because of ash die back. 
    I am looking at native trees/sub shrubs for flower, fruit, insect and bird friendly and autumn colour which do not grow too tall or require constant maintance.
    How about a guelder rose, viburnum lantana or dogwood in your garden?
    I have so far made a "short" list of 10 plants for the committee to consider as I have offered to cover the cost of the trees. I am hoping to get a discount from a local nursery for bare rooted plants. So far I have Aspen, Sorbus aucuparia, Crab apple, Field Maple, Spindle Tree, Rowan, Viburnum lantana and Red Oak  on my list. It would be lovely to have some of each, should look spectacular in a good autumn. Sadly there are a lot of ash trees on the site which all have signs of die back, those which could be dangerous with dead branches falling off are going first but the rest are being monitored.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,567
    AnniD said:
    A friend of mine has an ekianthus which looks stunning in Autumn and very pretty. There a several varieties but a search makes me think it's this one
    https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/enkianthus-cernuus-f-rubens/

    Enkianthus are wonderful for flowers in spring and fab autumn leaf colour.

    Thought I should just mention that Enkianthus cernuus rubens is rather rare and not easy to obtain.
    I first  time I saw one was in Cefn On gardens near Cardiff. I wanted one!
    We already had Enkianthus campanulatus.
    We would buy Enkianthus C.R...wait maybe for 2 years until it flowered ..only to discover we had been sold a pup...it was just plain Enkianthus campanulatus...the flowers maybe a bit more pink than some. I have lost count of how many we bought...I think it was 12. We never did get the genuine shrub.

    Until we moved here to Perthshire. Now we at long last have a genuine one...from Glendoick  gardens.where they also grow it in their woodland garden.

    The way to tell is the flowers.
    Enkianthus cernuus rubens has  red flowers which are sharp, jagged, pointed on the edges...pics 1- 4
    Enkianthus campanulatus has flowers with scalloped edges Pics 5 - 8.






    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,590
    edited 23 November
    What about a Euonymus alatus? Plant something airy in front of it for the summer and it can
    be cut back to reveal the glorious autumn colour.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • D0rdogne_DamselD0rdogne_Damsel Saint Yrieix La Perche, FrancePosts: 2,531
    edited 23 November
    Thank you all, I have been Googling everything you've suggested for ages!  :smiley:

    Because this area is set back from the main 'lawn' area, I use the term loosely, you only see it from a bit of a distance so some of these striking colours will be perfect, choices choices, I might need to peruse some more photos before making any decisions.  ;)
    Gardeners, I think, dream bigger dreams than emperors. – Mary Cantwell
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,567
    edited 23 November
    At the moment I am researching trees and sub shrubs to be planted on our village green due to ash trees having to be felled because of ash die back. 
    I am looking at native trees/sub shrubs for flower, fruit, insect and bird friendly and autumn colour which do not grow too tall or require constant maintance.
    How about a guelder rose, viburnum lantana or dogwood in your garden?
    I have so far made a "short" list of 10 plants for the committee to consider as I have offered to cover the cost of the trees. I am hoping to get a discount from a local nursery for bare rooted plants. So far I have Aspen, Sorbus aucuparia, Crab apple, Field Maple, Spindle Tree, Rowan, Viburnum lantana and Red Oak  on my list. It would be lovely to have some of each, should look spectacular in a good autumn. Sadly there are a lot of ash trees on the site which all have signs of die back, those which could be dangerous with dead branches falling off are going first but the rest are being monitored.
    Joyce Goldenlily.....just read your post....."I am looking at native trees/sub shrubs for flower, fruit, insect and bird friendly and autumn colour which do not grow too tall or require constant maintenance".

    I feel you need to rethink.
    Quercus rubra ..common name red Oak.
    It not a native tree..it is also a fast growing  huge tree...from North America.

                         Oak, red (Quercus rubra)

    Fiery, fast and spiked, the red oak is a fast-growing tree native to North America.

    .....................................................................

    Sorbus aucuparia..common name is rowan.Good choice.

    Populus temulus...common name Aspen...super autumn colour, grow large... they are rather notorious for suckering.

    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
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