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tree for windy coastal site

CaptainBlackCaptainBlack Morecambe BayPosts: 7
Hi,

I have a need for a tree that will survive on a gale  battered, exposed garden with sandy soil. i had to chop the original pine tree down due to root and light issues. these have now been resolved and I've been planting pine trees but can't seem to find the same type and they usually "burn" on the windy side either not long after planting or over time. Any ideas? Thanks
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Posts

  • Sycamore is a tree I have seen doing OK in exposed sites right at the coast.
  • WaysideWayside Posts: 801
    edited 20 November
    Whereabouts are you?  In the UK, North/South/East/West?

    (Slightly off-topic, but I did read that Hypericum, is used for sand bank control.)
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,630
    edited 20 November
    The Old Vicarage at East Ruston on the wind-blown Norfolk coast has a shelter belt of Monterey Pines and other trees ... if you read down here you’ll find the list. http://www.e-ruston-oldvicaragegardens.co.uk/pages/view/564/home.htm

    The soil there is light and sandy and the winds, laden with sea spray, come straight from the Urals.  The Monterey Pines seem very happy there. 


    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 2,573
    I would suggest you see what trees survive near you...they will be in the same soil/same weather conditions. 
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 1,424
    I wanted to suggest a pine, after reading the title and before reading the details :) Maybe one of the mountain types?
    Here is my photo of the Newborough forest on the coast of Anglesey, fully exposed to south-westerly winds and very sandy soil. They have a mix of Corsican and Monterey pines. The outer ones get windburnt too, I think it can't be avoided in so windy area. Here is a full list of their pines (and other trees).

  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 2,130
    Some pines grow very big. How big do you want your tree to be?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,156
    I'd agree that you need to see what's growing nearby, but you'll also have to accept that a shelter belt of anything will get damaged. If you only want one tree, you'll need something else outside of that to provide the shelter.
    Gardens in coastal areas, can grow all sorts of plants if they have that protection, especially when it's needed for protection from salt spray . If it's windy because it's at altitude, and/or in a northern, exposed location, that's different again. 
    A photo would help to give an idea of the size of the area too, as well as a rough idea of location.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • CaptainBlackCaptainBlack Morecambe BayPosts: 7
    hi Wayside,

    I'm on the corner of Morecambe Bay in the north west of England
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,630
    And the size of your garden and distance from buildings that you want to plant your tree/s?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • CaptainBlackCaptainBlack Morecambe BayPosts: 7
    Hi Posy,

    it's only a small garden so I'd not be looking for anything more than about 3 -4 metres in height 
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