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WINTER TRADITIONS IN YOUR PART OF THE WORLD

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Yes, there’s usually a German market in Manchester in December. Sadly, not this year. 

    Looking at pictures of St Martin’s Day celebrations in Germany, I can see the same importance is given to light and warmth, lanterns and bonfires, as in other countries’ winter festivals.  

    As a vegetarian, I can’t say I’m exactly enthusiastic about the slaughtering of the geese. I don’t really like the idea of other creatures having to suffer for the sake of human beings’ odd ideas. 🙁


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Another carol that found favour in the Sheffield area was written in 1812 and refers to the Peninsula War, while also managing to bring in a vaguely Christmas reference to a shepherd.

    Not familiar with the Peninsula war? Me neither. In a nutshell, then. Napoleon having picked fights with a lot of countries, installed his brother Joseph as King of Spain. Unsurprisingly, the Spanish weren’t too keen on this. And so our armed forces joined forces with the Spanish and went to war against the French (again) and those Spanish people who supported Napoleon. Hence the reference to “yon French and Spaniards”.

    The words are not in the least Christmassy, but that doesn’t affect the enthusiasm with which it’s sung.


    Yes, it’s called Pratty Flowers. And a one old bloke said to a sniggering newcomer to the pub, “Get over it,”

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ytlME4IrqP4

    And, as the following recording shows, French and Spaniards can be changed to Huns and Austrians, depending on the times.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FgDkvrtTFEA

    I must admit, I found it hard not to giggle when listening to that one. 😁
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Oh dear, BBC Radio One’s having a fit of the vapours.

    What is Christmas without at least one drunken rendition of Fairytale of New York?

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/nov/19/fairytale-of-new-york-pogues-censored-radio-1-radio-2

    What next, Shakespeare without the naughty bits?




    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Sometimes the Sheffield Carols are sung as a solo. The same carol is always sung by the same person, some by men, some by women. The chorus allows the other people in the room to join in.

    Here is one which was imported from America and always has an enthusiastic following.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EGsDbvdOAsU


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Just been adding up the number of tunes for While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night that are still sung in and around Sheffield and North Derbyshire today.

    24.

    Not including the one that everybody knows as the “proper” tune, which is called  “Old” Winchester because it was composed in 1696. The words of course go back to 1592.

    When you think that the 1860 purge of local hymns, and the writing of Hymns Ancient and Modern, limited the singers to just 273 tunes, and compare that number to how many tunes were composed around Sheffield alone and for While Shepherds Watched alone, you can see what a vast collection of local music must have been lost countrywide.  Something akin to burning the library of Alexandria.

    So here is another version of While Shepherds. This pub very kindly supplies the singers with a flip chart, just in case they can’t remember what comes next.

    This one is called “Liverpool” and it was written in the second half of the 18th century.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nEBBRp9amLU



    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,527
    pansyface said:

    They selected a measly 273 hymns, selected by themselves as fit to be sung in church. They bound them together into the book known as Hymns Ancient and Modern, the book that is still to be found in Anglican churches today, give or take the odd hymn.


    I heard an apocryphal tale of a vicar who named his two cats "Ancient" and "Modern", on the grounds that they were both hims.


  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Here are the words to a carol you all know. But the title gives you a clue that it’s not going to be plain sailing.



    This one is sung in a couple of villages in north Derbyshire. If you are not “a singer” and can’t read music, this tune leads you on a merry dance. It is in four parts and is a joy to sing whether you know what you are doing or not.

    Here it is being sung by people who do know what they are doing.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NXWfgnG_fgc


    And here it is being sung  by some slightly tiddly non musicians in the Angler’s Rest, Bamford. Joined, a little way in, by the waitress trying to deliver a meal to table seventeen.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OkKdngliXNI

    For sheer craziness, this is one of my favourite carols. There is usually a cheer at the end when everyone realises that they have survived the rollercoaster ride. 😊



    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    The Sheffield carols were often named after the writer’s or the composer’s home.  One such carol is Spout Cottage, written in the 1860s.

    Spout Cottage was in the grounds of Spout House, a once-grand 16th century manor house. In the grounds of the house was a spring, a spout, and the house was licensed for baptisms. Local children were dipped into the spring, which must have been quite an ordeal in winter.

    Spout House is now derelict, Spout Cottage gone, but Spout Lane still exists. It is in the Sheffield suburb of Stannington, which in the 1860s would have been quite an isolated and windswept village.

    Here are the singers of the nearby village of Dungworth giving it their best shot.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TdQtvhKVlc0


    As with many of these carols, written by ordinary people, the vocabulary is local to the area: “While” is used in Sheffield instead of “until”. As a result, it didn’t make it into Hymns Ancient and Modern.




    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,756
    Another tune named after a place, this time in 19th century industrial Lancashire.

     Cunliffe Street is the tune and Angels From the Realms of Glory is the text.  


    It’s sung here by a now disbanded quartet, two of whom still pop across to enemy territory (Yorkshire) to sing on Boxing Day. Well, not this Boxing Day, but maybe next.

    A sweet tune that sounds much more beautiful than its title.

    https://oneaccord.eu/Cunliffe%20Street.mp3



    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 2,825
    pansyface said:
    The Sheffield carols were often named after the writer’s or the composer’s home.  One such carol is Spout Cottage, written in the 1860s.

    Spout Cottage was in the grounds of Spout House, a once-grand 16th century manor house. In the grounds of the house was a spring, a spout, and the house was licensed for baptisms. Local children were dipped into the spring, which must have been quite an ordeal in winter.

    Spout House is now derelict, Spout Cottage gone, but Spout Lane still exists. It is in the Sheffield suburb of Stannington, which in the 1860s would have been quite an isolated and windswept village.

    Here are the singers of the nearby village of Dungworth giving it their best shot.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TdQtvhKVlc0


    As with many of these carols, written by ordinary people, the vocabulary is local to the area: “While” is used in Sheffield instead of “until”. As a result, it didn’t make it into Hymns Ancient and Modern.




    I'm amazed that I never came across the Sheffield carols! I grew up on that side of Sheffield and went to school in Stannington, but my family weren't either pub-goers or church-goers so carols didn't really feature in my upbringing.

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