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WINTER TRADITIONS IN YOUR PART OF THE WORLD

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  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 6,505
    edited November 2020
    I remember in my childhood, visiting my grandmother in Essex and being shown a local village church with a musicians' gallery.  In it there was a glass case containing an ancient bassoon, which was used in times past to accompany the singing...

    I can recommend non-conformist churches for much more user-friendly hymns and songs.   :)  And in the CofE, Hymns Ancient & Modern has largely been replaced by less stuffy music too...
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,787
    😊

    Glad to hear that, Liri.

    Here is a group of musicians leading some singers into a carol with a symphony. The carol is called Pentonville. That’s the name of the tune. I’m sure, when you hear it, you will know it by another name. 🙂

    The sound of the music and the singing, the vitality of the tempo, the roughness of the mix of instruments, and the love of the local, community carol felt by the singers gives a hint of what the west gallery musicians and the singing of the congegations must have sounded like pre 1830.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=87PFoh9VJP8





    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,787
    edited November 2020
    Sorry, that should have been “pre 1860”.

    Since the church had no sway over what could be sung in the pubs, the carollers could add new songs to their repertoire of carols.  Intensely religious ones, such as the previously mentioned “Down in Yon Forest” rubbed shoulders with the latest popular ballads.

    In the 1830s a song was composed, with words by the same person who wrote “Home Sweet Home”. By the 1860s it was described as the most popular song ever written. It doesn’t have much in common with Home Sweet Home. It is gloriously creepy and is sung with much enthusiasm in some Sheffield pubs today.

    Here is a rendition, but not sung in a pub.🙂


    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VN80YcwBugk


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,787
    Here are the words if you want to sing along.

    They do say that it is based on a true story but nobody can decide on which one.😊


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,961
    edited November 2020
    I haven't seen it personally, but one of the villages near where I grew up have kept the tradition of Mumming and Guising alive. 



    Then you have the Boxing Day rafting at Matlock. But that's not such an old tradition. Good fun if you don't mind being pelted with eggs and bags of flour as your craft capsizes in a freezing Derwent to the cheers of onlookers!

    The Most Breathtaking Photos From Around The World This Week  HuffPost

    Maybe it's something in the Derbyshire water?
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,787
    edited November 2020
    Would that we Winster, Loxley? I’d know those faces anywhere!😊 Winster also has its own special carols, which are sung in the Miner’s Arms (not sung in the miner’s arms, you understand).



    I can’t find a recording of the carols, but the photo of one of the windows gives a sense of the cosiness of the pub inside.


     

    Ah yes, the Matlock raft race. Bakewell do one but they sensibly choose August for their ducking. 😊


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,961
    Yes, Winster - I've been in the Miner's Arms a few times but not at Christmas time.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,787
    I once read somewhere (possibly in the Miner’s Arms website) that at the height of the lead mining industry there were 37 pubs in Winster. Not bad going for a village that barely has 37 houses. 😊 

    Lovely village, Winster. The little road from there to Birchover is one of our favourites. Will we meet another vehicle coming the other way? Will we have to reverse two miles back to the start? 😁

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,961
    There's a nice little plant nursery there too 
  • dappledshadedappledshade Top of the Hill, North London Posts: 691
    Nothing specifically in Muswell Hill sadly, but with a German OH I do love the German tradition of St. Martin’s day (11th November) when children meet to create lanterns and carry them in a procession (there are events in London, but cancelled this year, obciously).
    The run up to Christmas isn’t complete for me unless I’ve gone to a proper Christmas market - German one ideally in Germany, but the Swedish version at the Swedish church in London, is also magic.
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