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Transplanted my Purple Raspberry Stump 10 days ago - Will it establish before the frosts?

pinkskyinthecitypinkskyinthecity Nottinghamshire, England Posts: 40
They're about 11' tall with five next season's canes on one stump. Originally, they were growing underneath some paved bricks in an inconvenient spot (next to the washing line!) and finally, I've moved it closer to a fence, with about 5 roots were quite thick and about 10" long (not a rootball). Will this establish okay for next year, I wonder? I will be sosooso sad if it doesn't as I've had it for about 7 years. (Yes, it is actually a special purple-coloured one, doesn't send runners, just throws up new canes on one plant).
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    If it's that height, I'd cut it back. It'll be easier for it to establish. It means being realistic about flowering and fruiting next year though.  :)
    Frost doesn't affect raspberries. 
    I assume it's Glen Coe? 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pinkskyinthecitypinkskyinthecity Nottinghamshire, England Posts: 40
    Hi Fairygirl, 

    Thanks for replying. I can't remember the variety but I chose it because it was spine-free and does not send runners as its grown one a stump. That's a win-win situation that is a must for any raspberry-loving gardener. (Current prices are very dear compared to my original purchase at £6 per plant) but they are well worth it as they're super easy to grow and the taste is a lot sweeter than normal red raspberries. One downside though; they're not as portable as they are softer exterior. 

    The current canes are next year's crop so I'm quite reluctant to cut it down. Originally, I had these on my allotment 5 years ago and transferred to my garden but the canes weren't this long, but they did have a decent rootball, though. I'll have to wait and see if they have survived next spring. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    I'm not sure what you mean by runners. Raspberries don't produce runners. Are you mixing them up with strawberries? 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pinkskyinthecitypinkskyinthecity Nottinghamshire, England Posts: 40
    The normal raspberry grows new shoots/next year's canes within the growing season. Are they not called runners?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    Ah - I was just worried there was something else growing in with them or there was a problem somewhere. They're just called canes  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pinkskyinthecitypinkskyinthecity Nottinghamshire, England Posts: 40
     :D:s   technically speaking, they're like a strawberry where the canes often spread quite well via their shallow root system - wouldn't you agree? ;)
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    No. Totally different  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pinkskyinthecitypinkskyinthecity Nottinghamshire, England Posts: 40
    Fairygirl said:
    No. Totally different  :)
    what would you call it?  :)
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 6,510
    I think they can be called underground runners on raspberries... strictly "underground lateral roots" from which new shoots (canes) emerge.  Strawberry runners are above ground and have new plantlets on the end, which then root themselves into the soil.  Strawberry plants don't produce new plants from their roots, but from these above ground runners and plantlets.  Both are effective methods of spread...   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    Yes - a different habit of growth and reproduction altogether.
    Strawberries produce a new plant above ground [runner] which is removed and grown on to produce fruit of it's own, and eventually replacing the original plants which become less productive over time. 
    Raspberries are more like woody shrubs [or clematis] producing new stems [ called canes] from the main root, which then produce fruit, but on the original plant. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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