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Suggestions for trees please

Hi
I would like to plant a row of small trees (or large bushes) to screen off the last third of my garden and the houses beyond. They would be planted in raised beds which are two sleepers high and I'd like to use the same trees across the beds so I would probably need at least 4 so they can't be too expensive.
I want something with flowers, good autumn colour, maybe interesting trunks and something that would screen quite quickly but not grow ridiculously tall. 
I had considered espalier or pleached but think they would be a) too expensive and b) too difficult to maintain.
As this will be the main view from the house I want to get it right and can't afford to replace them down the line.
I'd appreciate any ideas or suggestions you have.
Thanks!
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Posts

  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 468
    I have a very spaced out row of Prunus x subhirtella 'Autumnalis Rosea'. They don't make large trees, they flower sporadically during winter and more strongly in spring. They colour up nicely in autumn - though other ornamental cherries are much showier. Buying them shouldn't break the bank. I think they could be an option for you.
  • Thank you, they do look nice although the first one I saw was £130 which is a bit steep for me! 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 65,377
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,358
    I'm afraid 'screen quickly and not get too tall' is something we here regularly on the forum. Those two things don't happen. Anything that grows quickly won't just stop at a convenient size - it will need maintenance. 
    Better to choose something that will eventually look good, and plant suitable sized specimens which will grow well.  :)
    Amelanchiers would be my choice. Pyrus salicifolius is also nice. Neither are evergreen though, so I don't know if they'd suit.
    Viburnum would be good if you wanted evergreen - although not all of them are. 
    All those are easy to maintain and readily available.  :)
     
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    I'm afraid 'screen quickly and not get too tall' is something we here regularly on the forum. Those two things don't happen. Anything that grows quickly won't just stop at a convenient size - it will need maintenance. 
    Better to choose something that will eventually look good, and plant suitable sized specimens which will grow well.  :)
    Amelanchiers would be my choice. Pyrus salicifolius is also nice. Neither are evergreen though, so I don't know if they'd suit.
    Viburnum would be good if you wanted evergreen - although not all of them are. 
    All those are easy to maintain and readily available.  :)
     
    Thanks Fairygirl, very sensible comment! Thanks for your suggestions too, I've looked them up and they look good. 
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,910
    Depending on your soil (they prefer acid to neutral, moist soil) and location, you could consider Arbutus unedo. According to the Ashridge site "They will grow quite quickly to about 3 metres and then become much less vigorous" and are lovely things if they're happy.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 3,881
    How tall do you want them to be/get? 

    Two years ago I planted a screening hedge of Nandina Domestica, they were approx 110cm high on purchase, a bit leggy looking, but since them have really filled out and are 150cm high, plus 40cm height of the raised bed. Evergreen or semi-evergreen, depending whereabouts in the UK you are, small white flowers in spring, large sprays of red berries in Autumn when the attractive foliage takes on lovely orange-red hues. Worth buying larger specimens as they are slower growing in the UK, but have a neat, graceful profile and won’t get too big. It’s pouring with rain at the moment otherwise I would take a photo!
  • WaysideWayside Posts: 801
    edited November 2020
    How high do you need them?  And do they need to all be the same?  Four choice shrubs may suit.  What's the location/aspect/sun?  And how much room have you got for them?

    My choices change during the year, but trees that you can hack back if needed can be feld maple and Hazel.  Field maple great fall colour.  Dense leaf.  Hazel is beautiful lovely small leaves that grow large.  Be prepared for it to fan out, you can plant as a big shrub.  It's another that you could hack back if needed, (or probably take out a third at a time from the base?).  Forsythia can get quite large, multi-stem vase shape, is a good screen, and brings a smile in spring.  I'd go for a mix, with different sizes and shapes.  Even something like buddleia, that when established, can be cut back for thick opaque growth, but it would probably want sun.  I know those things sound quite pedestrian, but they are all winners to me.

  • Nollie said:
    How tall do you want them to be/get? 

    Two years ago I planted a screening hedge of Nandina Domestica, they were approx 110cm high on purchase, a bit leggy looking, but since them have really filled out and are 150cm high, plus 40cm height of the raised bed. Evergreen or semi-evergreen, depending whereabouts in the UK you are, small white flowers in spring, large sprays of red berries in Autumn when the attractive foliage takes on lovely orange-red hues. Worth buying larger specimens as they are slower growing in the UK, but have a neat, graceful profile and won’t get too big. It’s pouring with rain at the moment otherwise I would take a photo!
    Thanks, they look nice. 
  • Wayside said:
    How high do you need them?  And do they need to all be the same?  Four choice shrubs may suit.  What's the location/aspect/sun?  And how much room have you got for them?

    My choices change during the year, but trees that you can hack back if needed can be feld maple and Hazel.  Field maple great fall colour.  Dense leaf.  Hazel is beautiful lovely small leaves that grow large.  Be prepared for it to fan out, you can plant as a big shrub.  It's another that you could hack back if needed, (or probably take out a third at a time from the base?).  Forsythia can get quite large, multi-stem vase shape, is a good screen, and brings a smile in spring.  I'd go for a mix, with different sizes and shapes.  Even something like buddleia, that when established, can be cut back for thick opaque growth, but it would probably want sun.  I know those things sound quite pedestrian, but they are all winners to me.

    Wayside said:
    How high do you need them?  And do they need to all be the same?  Four choice shrubs may suit.  What's the location/aspect/sun?  And how much room have you got for them?

    My choices change during the year, but trees that you can hack back if needed can be feld maple and Hazel.  Field maple great fall colour.  Dense leaf.  Hazel is beautiful lovely small leaves that grow large.  Be prepared for it to fan out, you can plant as a big shrub.  It's another that you could hack back if needed, (or probably take out a third at a time from the base?).  Forsythia can get quite large, multi-stem vase shape, is a good screen, and brings a smile in spring.  I'd go for a mix, with different sizes and shapes.  Even something like buddleia, that when established, can be cut back for thick opaque growth, but it would probably want sun.  I know those things sound quite pedestrian, but they are all winners to me.

    The Field Maple looks good. I do want them all to be the same. I'd quite like some interesting trunks and considered white birch but they grow too tall. Thanks for your suggestions. 
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