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Plug plants with a teabag type liner

EustaceEustace OxfordPosts: 639
Do you plant the plug plants that come in teabag type cloth liner as it is or do you remove them before planting? I thought they were degradable; however, the ones I planted in spring still have them around the roots. Thanks.
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 42,435
    Most people find them terrible, so they remove them. 
    I can't comment as it's something I rarely buy, and any that I have, have been in proper cells not the teabags.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,505
    Definitely rip them off and throw away, horrible stuff.  Try to do it with least root disturbance.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 8,680
    I've only bought them a couple of times, the first lot were a disaster. The roots went nowhere and the "tea bag" didn't degrade. Second lot l removed the bag, much better.
  • B3B3 Posts: 19,978
    Try gently to get it off. Failing that, try to damage it.
    They are claimed to be biodegradable and they say you can plant them. Don't. They're not. They restrict the roots and keep water out of
    I've found them in the soil years later or around dead plants with bone dry roots.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • B3B3 Posts: 19,978
    I've found them in pot grown plants too. The sellers plant up the teabagged plugs into bigger pots. I try to have a little poke around the soil before I buy them. Just in case.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • EustaceEustace OxfordPosts: 639
    Thanks everyone for your prompt replies.
    B3 said:
    I've found them in pot grown plants too.
    The 2L fuchsia standards I bought from Homebase this year also had them around the roots :'(

  • SueAtooSueAtoo DorsetPosts: 223
    Did anyone see the programme with Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall about lots of teabags actually being plastic?
  • SueAtooSueAtoo DorsetPosts: 223
    Also hate the plastic netting that some turf comes on. Lasts forever and is fine enough to cut your fingers when digging.
  • WilderbeastWilderbeast East YorkshirePosts: 1,256
    On the teabag thing 85% of them contain plastic, hence I always tear them open then tip the contents only into the compost. 
  • B3B3 Posts: 19,978
    There are several threads on teabag technology as they like to call it.
    It's entirely to facilitate the  industrialiation of horticulture.. It is of absolutely no benefit to the gardener and even less benefit to the plant. 
    I have had plants that mysteriously died, pulled them out and found the roots trapped in bone dry compost whilst surrounded by appropriately damp soil.
    You have happened up on my hobbyhorse. I will exit and fume😠
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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