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ID and a question

Pauline 7Pauline 7 West Yorkshire Posts: 2,103
Can anyone identify this for me please.








Now for the question
When it has finished flowering, if I cut it down to the bottom of the stems, ( in the 2nd photo ) will it grow back next year? 
Thanks. 

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    One of the Sedums - they have a new name that  I can't remember.
    I usually leave them and take the dead stems off in spring, but you can do it now. 
    They're fairly indestructible, and easy to propagate from cuttings.
    The stems die back anyway, and new growth comes through in spring. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,356
    It’s an ice plant ... used to be called Sedum spectabile now it’s called something I can’t remember.  Don’t know which variety ... there’s quite a few. 

    Yes it will come back next year.

     I leave the flower stems in over winter as they look great in the frost. 

    It’s much loved by bees and butterflies and strikes really easily from cuttings in gritty soil. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    edited October 2020
    They are called "hylotelephiums" now, I think.  If you don't want them so high but with more flowers next year, you can do 'the Chelsea chop' at the appropriate time next year.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Pauline 7Pauline 7 West Yorkshire Posts: 2,103
    Thanks all. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    I think that's quite likely @philippasmith2 :)
    Thanks @BobTheGardener - I'm never going to be able to call them that!

    I can never chop mine - they're only about 6 inches high by the time Chelsea's on, but I might try doing some a month later, and see what happens. Ours are all finished by now though, and looking a bit manky, so it may just mean an even shorter flowering season for them.  
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Pauline 7Pauline 7 West Yorkshire Posts: 2,103
    Those pics were taken this morning. When they started to flower they looked like theyn were going to be pale pink, but as they came out they went darker.

    Looking them up they do look very like Autumn Joy
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    There's quite a few that are all similar @Pauline 7, but I have  A. Joy and it looks very much like that  :)
    I've just done some cuttings so that I can stick some into the back garden again. Mine are in the front, and I'm not often out there. They're humming with bees in late summer though, so very valuable  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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