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Hawthorns - layout suggestions

Hi all

I'd like to canvas views on what to do with these mature hawthorns. I'm in the process of re-designing and re-planting our garden with a woodland-edge theme. We're lucky to have a number of hawthorns already and they will mostly be remaining. Fear not, I am not about to rip them all out. 

However, they are quite dominant and the layout does not look...right, currently for the size of the space. There is a gap between 4 and 5 which interrupts the flow and they are in danger of swamping other areas e.g. the young crab apple tree on the right hand side.  I think some re-positioning and limited removal might be necessary. 

I've numbered them 1 to 5 in the photos.

How would you tackle these from a design perspective? It's a west facing wall in a fairly small garden. Current options are:

1. Remove 2 or 3, leaving a few trees with equal gaps in between (other plants can infill those gaps)

2. Add another between 4 and 5, though that could look a bit odd to have "hedging" along only 75% of the border

3. Leave them completely alone and work around them

4. leave just one or 2 and let them grow as feature trees (Maybe 2 and 4, or 3/5 only)

What would you do?! I've been trying to make my mind up for a long time....


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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,889
    Hawthorns get huge. 
    I expect that's originally been hedge. 
    I'd only keep one. That gives scope for other plants to give more variety. Hawthorns suck up a lot of moisture too, which limits how well any other plant would grow and thrive.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Paul165Paul165 Posts: 97
    Yes I think it was defo hedge, looking at old photos of the house... 
  • I'd let at least one grow into a real tree.
    “Rivers know this ... we will get there in the end.”
  • Paul165Paul165 Posts: 97
    Hmm. So be a bit more ruthless with taking a few out and leave one room to breathe....? 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,889
    It's a pretty small garden from what I can see, so I'd be guided by that, and be realistic about how much shade one tree will eventually cast, as well as the impact on the surrounding soil. 
    Where you live, and your climate, will also dictate the latter.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,062
    Also,  if you give one tree room to breathe you can let it flower and produce berries. 

    If the area is crowded you’ll have to keep trimming them and then you’ll not get the full potential of the blossom etc. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Paul165Paul165 Posts: 97
    The big question is... Which one?? 
  • Ferdinand2000Ferdinand2000 Posts: 537
    edited October 2020
    Fairygirl said:
    It's a pretty small garden from what I can see, so I'd be guided by that, and be realistic about how much shade one tree will eventually cast, as well as the impact on the surrounding soil. 
    Where you live, and your climate, will also dictate the latter.

    A hawthorn is a pretty small (as well as small pretty) tree  B).

    (PS: For some time, at least.)
    “Rivers know this ... we will get there in the end.”
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,889
    I take it you've never seen a mature one @Ferdinand2000;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Paul165Paul165 Posts: 97
    Yeah they get big. Need them pruning regularly. Beautiful when in bloom. Supports more insect life than most others too. 
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