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Spring bulbs

spookessspookess Posts: 53
Hi,
I have potted up some Anemones bulbs (with Crocus too) and as per guidance from the suppliers I have put the container in my greenhouse (one of those pop up plastic things but they assured me it was adequate for keeping the draft off the anemone as they don't like it). 
The other containers of tulips, Hyacinths, crocus etc. are outside so getting rain and moisture from the air but the Anemone/crocus container aren't. Should I be watering them or just leave them alone? I don't want them to rot by overwaterting. 
Thanks. 
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,156
    You'll just need to make sure they don't dry out completely.
    I wouldn't have put anemones in with crocus though - crocus prefer quite moist conditions.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • spookessspookess Posts: 53
    Fairygirl said:
    You'll just need to make sure they don't dry out completely.
    I wouldn't have put anemones in with crocus though - crocus prefer quite moist conditions.  :)
    Oh bu**er! 😦 Will the crocus just not grow? I did them the weekend before last, do you think I should pick out the crocus? Or, because they are on the top layer, just water it enough that they will get the moisture they need without drowning the Anemones? X
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,156
    Sorry - I went out!
    Don't worry unnecessarily. Those anemones like sunny, well drained conditions, and that also suits crocus, but crocus will be happier if they have some moisture. It's why they often naturalise in all sorts of places. 
    As long as you have them in a decent growing medium, that drains well, it should be fine. Just don't go too mad with the watering can  ;)

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • spookessspookess Posts: 53
    Thank you ☺
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,156
    If you're really worried, you could certainly remove the crocus and pot them separately. That would be very easy to do  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • spookessspookess Posts: 53
    So a little update: 
    1. I got confused (I planted so many bulbs!), it is fritillary in with the Anemone, not crocus.
    2. Said fritillary is already sprouting! It is on the floor in a pop up, plastic, unheated greenhouse. At this rate, they'll be flowered and gone by spring! But inside the greenhouse where i won't be able to enjoy them as I am guessing it will be too cold to put them outside because of the Anemone in the same container. 
    3. The Calla I planted already had little shoots on, which are now poking out of the top of the soil/grit and pressing against the chicken wire I've put across my containers to stop any hungry squirrels. So that too may be flowered by the time it gets really cold and I don't know if it will survive as I have never managed to grow them. 

    All in all, the big displays i had prepped for Spring might be a bit underwhelming at this rate! 😢
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,156
    Why not try splitting up the bulbs in that pot - the fritillary one?
    The fritillaries can then go outside, in the ground if that's an option, and you can keep the anemones a bit more protected from the winter weather.  :)
    If you tip out the contents of the pot completely, it should be easy enough to separate them.
    I don't grow Callas so I can't advise on them. They're not very well suited to my conditions. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • spookessspookess Posts: 53
    I might have to do that Fairygirl. Will be a waste otherwise. They would have to go into another container as I don't have anywhere to put them in the ground. 
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 7,055
    As soon as the weather turns colder (which it's forecast to do over the whole UK later this week), you'll find the growth will come to a stop. It has been pretty mild over the last few weeks. I've got pots of various bulbs in my greenhouse and one or two shoots have started to appear. 
    Don't worry,  you won't have a Spring display in December (unless we have the mildest Winter on record).  :)
  • spookessspookess Posts: 53
    Thanks AnniD. I only started gardening in May (like most of the country probably 🤣), so haven't done the whole "overwinter" but or 0re-planting for spring so will be asking lots of questions. 
    My grandad was a gardener of both flowers and veg, and its something I wish I'd started doing before he passed away in December so I could have got his advice and (what I imagine to be) vast amount of hints & tips. 
    I must be channelling him in some way though - check out my first ever brassica harvest on Saturday! 😃 (Ignore the baby calabrese and 'tester cabbage' 🤣) 

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