Forum home Problem solving

What is wrong with my tomatoes please?

Hi and thanks in advance for any help you can give me. My tomatoes have been OK this season if a bit slow to ripen - I have read that was caused by the excessively hot weather earlier in the year. Anyway, I understand that any additional ripening of my remaining tomatoes is unlikely as they are in the garden, not in a greenhouse. I would like to know
A. What is wrong with my tomatoes?
B. If I cut off the bad bits can I still eat the remainder of the tomatoes? They look OK on the under side as you can see from the photo

Many thanks
Bob

«1

Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 2,591
    I think that's probably just a bit of cosmetic damage. Mine get like that when it's been windy. If they look OK inside, they'll be fine to eat.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,027
    edited 17 October
    Maybe the start of blossom end rot too. 
    Info here https://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/solve-problems/blossom-end-rot/

    Difficulties with consistent watering are often the cause, leading to the calcium problem, and it's certainly been difficult for many areas this year

    I've just realised it's the tops that are damaged - not the bottoms, so ignore that @BobMcFish :D
    Probably weather/cosmetic as @JennyJ says.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 2,591
    When my toms have had blossom end rot, it's always started at the opposite side, not around the stalk. But it's a possibility. Either way the unaffected part's still OK to eat.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,027
    Yes - clue's in the title @JennyJ :D

    My mistake, hence my edit. I think you're right - it's just weather damage or similar. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 534
    Commercial growers have these tomatoes too, except you don't see them because they go into the "seconds" bin or to the pigs which is about 8 out of 10 tomatoes. You only get the perfect stuff because that is what consumers want  - tomato seeds are developed for shelf life in the supermarket etc etc.   We grow the real stuff and our "home" tomatoes get blemishes and "noses"  - and they are not perfect but they taste better.  Don't worry about growing the perfect tomato, because it will never happen.  
    Enjoy your garden and its fruits.

    Cheers Tui. 
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 2,591
    🙂 There's always the chance that mother nature's done something wacky 🙃
    Fairygirl said:
    Yes - clue's in the title @JennyJ :D

    My mistake, hence my edit. I think you're right - it's just weather damage or similar. 


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,027
    @JennyJ - or maybe Bob's in Oz ;)
    Sorry @BobMcFish -we're bored, and just being silly  :)
    You're right @tuikowhai34 -we're so used to this idea that all produce is perfect because of what we see in shops. 
    The toms will be fine to eat @BobMcFish - so don't worry.  Always worth asking the question though  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobMcFishBobMcFish Posts: 12
    Thank you all so much for taking the time to help me! It’s really kind of you all. I was trying to find out if I had made some mistakes with the way I had grown them. I understand about not having perfect produce - we just have to look at organic produce to know that. I grew them (Alicante) in a growbag and after an initial period I began feeding them with organic plant food. I had some problems with splitting, mainly because I would water them on a dry morning and by the afternoon we’d have a deluge causing them to take on too much water. I have learned a few lessons this season so I will be doing things slightly differently next season
    Great to know they are OK to eat. I will most likely cook with them
    Thank you all again! I’m in sunny Hertfordshire by the way  B)
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,027
    edited 17 October
    Watering consistently is a big factor @BobMcFish , and it can be difficult if growing outside. Growing inside has it's problems too.  :)
    The other important thing is not to feed until the first truss of fruits are setting. Whatever you're growing them in will have enough nutrition for them up until that point  :)
    We're all learning all the time though. I think this year has been quite difficult for toms - for all sorts of reasons, and depending on the area you're in. Weather has been upside down and back to front everywhere! 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • BobMcFishBobMcFish Posts: 12
    You’re right it has been a difficult year. There were already some small toms and many flowers when I transferred them into the grow bags. I didn’t feed them for about 6 weeks after replanting them because the grow bag said it would sustain them for that time. Watering was the tough thing. Next time I will grow them under a shelter which I intend to make out of pallets I have gathered. Best wishes to all  :)
Sign In or Register to comment.