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Native hedge and shade

borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 284
Hi all.  I have a 25-metre boundary lined with some conifers which I'm having removed shortly with the intention of planting a native hedge in its place.  
The boundary runs east-west meaning the outside gets full sun and the inside (garden-facing) points north. Is there any point going to the trouble of planting a double-row if it means that the inside row (garden-side) will be permanently shaded by the outside row?
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    Native hedging pretty much just grows regardless of aspect. Some things will do better than others, depending on soil, moisture and general conditions. That's how it works  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 284
    Thank you!
  • rachelQrtJHBjbrachelQrtJHBjb South BucksPosts: 805
    We have plenty of hedges that run east to west with the north-facing side getting no direct sun as it flanks a bridleway and there's another hedge 4m from it. It's a double, staggered row and there are no issues. Think of farm hedges and the fact that many have a north-facing side yet grow perfectly well. I bought my bare root stock from Buckingham Nurseries and over the years have put in over 100m of hedging, some single species (hornbeam) but the majority mixed native.
  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 284
    Thanks Rachel.  In the mixed hedges, for the most natural effect did you just randomly jumble up the species, or would you have continuous sections of (e.g.) hawthorn, hazel, etc interspersed with clusters of others?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    You'd mix them up.  :)
    As I said- some will do better than others, depending on the conditions/aspect, but that's just standard for a mixed native hedge.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 284
    Thanks for all the help so far!  A local nursery told me they don't stock Hawthorn because it's a silent carrier of fireblight.  I had planned to use a substantial proportion of hawthorn and I know I can easily source it elsewhere.  
    But would it be socially irresponsible for me to plant it?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    How odd. I've never heard that before. It's widely used all over the UK as stock hedging.
    Are you in the UK?

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • borgadrborgadr KentPosts: 284
    edited October 2020
    Yes, I'm down in Kent. Hawthorn is very common down here, and a gorgeous sight in spring. I didn't see any warnings against it on GW and even an article earlier this year recommending it for hedging.
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,443
    Strictly speaking, the nursery is right, and hawthorn can be a "silent carrier" of fireblight.  But if hawthorn is common in your area anyway, I can't see any problem in having it in your hedge.  It's not as if you'd be introducing a "foreigner", after all...
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    That's fascinating @Liriodendron. I've never heard of that before.
    I wonder what the reasoning is by the nursery though. 
    Is it more likely to 'spread' in warmer areas or something like that?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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