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Which pot is better?

Hi All,

I'm new here thanks for creating a space for this to happen.
Today, I have a question to ask about pots.

I was wondering if there is a difference when it comes to plant pots,
is there a difference between plastic and terracotta pots?

There are these will gorgeous pots I'm thinking of getting, but wanted to hear your thoughts on this subject first.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/254...

Great to hear from you!
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Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 37,036
    Plastic is different from terracotta due to the water uptake of terracotta compared to plastic, but it largely depends on what's being grown in them too.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 25,730
    Like anything else, there are different qualities and different prices.

    Terracotta which has been baked high enough to withstand frost is expensive but you can buy cheaper pots and protect them with coats of clear acrylic varnish - not more than 3 or it goes milky.   It stops the clay absorbing moisture which expands when frozen and causes the cracking and flaking.   

    Standing them off the ground on pot feet will also help protect against frost damage.

    Plastic pots come in terracotta look-alike tones but you can also have fun with colours and they are generally easier to move around as they are lighter.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • iya_7iya_7 Posts: 5
    I love the natural look of terracotta, although it is heavy! and the bigger my plants get the less appeal that options become. Plastic is more out o convenience than anything, although saw some plastic pots that I liked and seemed to offer something different that is of interest to me. 

    Oh that sounds like a great option, I will have a lookout for them! 
  • iya_7iya_7 Posts: 5
    Fairygirl said:
    Plastic is different from terracotta due to the water uptake of terracotta compared to plastic, but it largely depends on what's being grown in them too.  :) 



    It's for my house plants mainly, plastic sounds like a decent choice for now. 
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,143
    iya_7 said:
    Hi All,

    I'm new here thanks for creating a space for this to happen.
    Today, I have a question to ask about pots.

    I was wondering if there is a difference when it comes to plant pots,
    is there a difference between plastic and terracotta pots?

    There are these will gorgeous pots I'm thinking of getting, but wanted to hear your thoughts on this subject first.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/254...

    Great to hear from you!

    They'll be OK for small-ish house plants (they are only about 6 inches diameter in old money). Be sure to empty out the drip tray after each watering.
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 571
    Terracotta pots look beautiful and have prices to match. When I moved, I was convinced that I would go for them as this is a forever home. However, big ones weigh a ton when planted and the cost of good quality wheels is also high. There are plenty of nice looking plastic pots these days, but do beware of ones with a double, open lip if you think that you will want to move the plants to a bigger pot. The only way you can get the plants out of these is with a saw (for the pot not the plant!).  
  • CeresCeres Posts: 2,102
    Terracotta pots dry out more quickly in sunshine but they have one huge advantage over plastic pots. You can recycle them as crocks when they break whereas plastic just goes in the bin. Plastic is okay for house plants as you will be hiding them in another container but the latter is not necessary with terracotta. They both have their good and bad points but when it comes to patina, terracotta wins hands down.

  • I upcycled two old dustbins that I stored corn in for my chickens after being inspired by the pots in September's GW magazine!
  • B3B3 Posts: 18,202
    I like mossy terracotta best then glazed pottery but plastic has its uses too.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 37,036
    From reading further posts, I think the OP needs them for houseplants, so a dustbin might be just a a tad large..... :D
    Terracotta wouldn't be great indoors anyway, due to moisture loss, unless it's for succulents etc.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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