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North Facing Fence

Regarding climbing plants, when one of them requires a South facing planting, is it okay to plant them on the north side of this type of fence? Unfortunately, they can't be planted on the south facing side.


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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,116
    Impossible because the land isn’t yours? In which case the landowner could dig them up at any time.

    Or some other reason?
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,355
    edited September 2020
    If a climber requires the higher light levels of a south facing position, its flowers will face the sun.

     If it’s planted on the north side of that fence the flowers will grow towards the south and face the sun so the north facing side will look pretty sparse. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    The fence isn't really suitable anyway as it is. Too gappy. Plants would just fall through to the other side too.
    It also doesn't look very high, so the problem described by @Dovefromabove would exacerbate it. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    The fence isn't really suitable anyway as it is. Too gappy. Plants would just fall through to the other side too.
    It also doesn't look very high, so the problem described by @Dovefromabove would exacerbate it. 

    I think you're right. I wonder what I could do with this fence, maybe a shade loving climber or just a hedge
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,461
    I don't think the fence will create much shade, but as others have said, you don't want something that will be forever trying to climb out to the sunny side.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,355
    Are there animals kept on the field the other side of the fence?  If so that'll have impact on your options ... animals lean over fences and eat tasty hedges etc.   :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • I'd trial a Lonicera periclymenum, and/or perhaps a couple of not-too-dense shrubs (if there are livestock you'll want to check what is or is not poisonous, too). You won't want anything too thuggish or formal, or you'll spoil the rural look of the fence. But I have seen this kind of fence successfully growing climbers. It's just that plants that cling onto their support with little tendrils or leaf axils, like Clematis, won't cope very well with the gaps. A wild-looking rose variety, or one which is really a largish shrub but can be trained, like the Hybrid Musks 'Moonshine', 'Queen of the Musks' or 'Kathleen', might also work well here; they'd embrace the fence but not smother it, and not interrupt the transparency. Your best bet might be to plant at the base of one of the uprights.

    https://www.paramountplants.co.uk/plant/rm/rosa-moonlight-rose.html

    Precisely because the fence is so see-through, the north-facing aspect won't matter that much, though a rose probably will flower more towards the sun. You want to think of your chosen plant as more of a 'leaner' than a climber: something that will hug the support.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,171
    I'd put a hawthorn hedge in there if it was mine. A reasonable distance in from the fence so that it could establish, even if there's stock on the other side.
    We're almost at bare root hedging time, so it's a more economical way of doing it too. It will also provide some shelter from wind if you have any there. It seems quite exposed.

    If you wanted, at a later date, you could add a climber to grow through it too.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 2,112
    You have a north-facing fence in a full sun location. Shade-loving plants wouldn't do well there. The usual advice assumes the fence is solid and casting shade, north-facing => shade, south-facing => sun. The sun duration is significantly more important than the aspect. I would assume that blooms on the sunny side or plants growing towards light would only be a problem with some plants (and maybe not, it is more like a trellis in a sunny position than a fence, but who knows). It would be a perfect place for roses. Hybrid musks, wilder-looking shrubs or something like Kew Gardens by David Austin. They have it photographed on a very similar fence.
  • Fairygirl said:
    I'd put a hawthorn hedge in there if it was mine. A reasonable distance in from the fence so that it could establish, even if there's stock on the other side.
    We're almost at bare root hedging time, so it's a more economical way of doing it too. It will also provide some shelter from wind if you have any there. It seems quite exposed.

    If you wanted, at a later date, you could add a climber to grow through it too.

    I have two spare Pyracanthas lying around. Would they be good? Should they be planted away from the fence to make more of a hedge, or tied in to wires on the fence itself?
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