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Not sure if technique or problem question

cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
Hi there 

These are photos of my french lavender after a prune, l think that I may have lost a load of it as it seems woody and knarly near the bottom of the plant any thoughts? 🙂 

Thanks 

Carol 

3

Posts

  • cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
    Another pic
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,400
    All Lavenders grow woody at the base over time.
    Did they tear it out with talons of steel
    And give you a shot, so that you wouldn't feel?
    And washed it away as if it wasn't real?
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,344
    When you prune it, use some of the cut off bits for cuttings.  Then when the old plant gets too leggy, you have new ones to replace it.
  • cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
    @punkdoc
    @josusa47

    Hi thanks for your feedback, as it happens it was planted as a new plant in March lol so I've managed to do this in it's first year 😳😂
  • tuikowhai34tuikowhai34 Béziers, Herault, FrancePosts: 480
    Nah - looks good.  I have the same.
    A good hoeing is worth two waterings.

  • cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
    @tuikowhai34

    Thanks for the reassuring feedback, good to know 😊
  • cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
    Hi the photos here are my English lavender planted from small plugs in March I kind of went ghung ho with them as I wanted to see which locations were best for them.

    The two central ones look a bit unkempt but happy, the bees love them. 

    The other ones which I have trimmed did reasonably well but they are fighting for space so going to relocate them.   

    Any advice around relocating  newish lavender bushes as they enter their second year?

    Thanks again 


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,653
    They like a sunny position with well drained soil so they don't get wet feet in winter as that makes them unhappy and even dead.

    When you prune, you just need to remove all the spent flower stems back to their base and about an inch/2 to 3cms of the foliage stem.   As has been said, they will get woody at the base and they will also get bigger year on year but keeping them trimmed will help them live a long time.    Cuttings strike quite easily so you can always make more plants as insurance or to swap or give away.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • cazsophieq2019cazsophieq2019 Carrickfergus, Antrim Posts: 76
    Hi @Obelixx thanks for your reply I'm going to take your advice and take some cuttings.  I'm also going to plant a couple of the lavenders into containers, when it's safe to do so.

    Carol
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