Forum home Problem solving

Shade? Or not shade?

David.lifedrawingDavid.lifedrawing Posts: 27
edited 15 September in Problem solving
I hope this isn't a daft question, but there's a part of my border which gets full sun when the sun is high in the summer sky, but now in September when shadows are longer, it's in full shade. So does this require plants that like full sun / partial shade / full shade? 
«1

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,145
    Full  sun is regarded as around six to seven hours a day.
    Less than that is partial, and if there's little to no sun,  it's full shade. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,831
    Definitely not a daft question, I have a similar situation. Generally I think you'll be OK with plants for "full sun/partial shade." It matters less that they're receiving shade for longer at this time of year, when plants are winding down. (And it will be bright shade presumably). Some plants for full sun may be OK if they do their thing earlier on in the season, so long as they are in full sun during their growth period. But a few really do require a sunny open site all season. Plants which are for full shade only won't enjoy their midsummer baking so may not be suitable.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,831
    Fairygirl said:
    Full  sun is regarded as around six to seven hours a day.
    Less than that is partial, and if there's little to no sun,  it's full shade. 
    The problem is his site has >6 hours of sun in midsummer, but becomes shaded as we go into September (and presumably until around late April). So I think plants for "full sun / partial shade" will be best, as they are suitable for sun during summer, and will also take light shade in spring and autumn. There are a lot of plants like that, luckily.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,145
    edited 15 September
    I'd agree. A minimum of those hours would be regarded as a full sun position. 

    The spring /autumn timing is slightly irrelevant. It's summer conditions that they calculate the hours on. Most plants which need full sun, are dormant in autumn and winter so it doesn't matter. It's what they get at the time they need it most that's the relevant factor.
    A plant described as needing full sun, just means it needs at least 6 or 7 hours in spring/summer conditions. I don't know many parts of the UK that would get that in autumn and winter.  ;)

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks all, helpful as always
  • Chris Beardshaw, on the latest episode of Beechgrove, set the limit at 4 hours. Less than 4 hours sun and you've got a "shade" border.
    It's not really as black and white as it seems though. Plant a "full sun" plant in somewhere with 3 hours sun and it will be fine. It just might not flower as profusely or "perform" as it would do so in its natural habitat.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,831
    edited 15 September
    Fairygirl said:
    A plant described as needing full sun, just means it needs at least 6 or 7 hours in spring/summer conditions. I don't know many parts of the UK that would get that in autumn and winter.  ;)

    There are exceptions though. Some plants won't do as well in a location where they only get 6hrs of sun during one month of the year. Thinking of Eryngium yuccifolium, a prairie plant that performs late in the year and really likes full sun. I've been tracking the sun around my garden to try and find the optimal spot for it. I have less sun here than I though I had, thanks to the surrounding buildings!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,145
    It is indeed all relevant, because you can plant something in a south facing garden [in theory full sun] but if it's a tiny garden and surrounded by walls/hedges/fences, it's not going to get 'full sun'. A north facing site [in theory - shady] could be very open and a long way from anything causing shade. My front garden [north, north west]  has a very sunny spot right at the far end  :)
    The only way to give your plants optimum conditions, is to look at where the sun tracks round the garden, and judge accordingly. However, many plants will still thrive without those perfect conditions anyway. It's not the only factor is choosing a site for a plant, or vice versa.  :)
    Less than four hours would definitely be part shady to shady, and those other factors would also be taken into consideration.  Over four and a bit less than 6 or 7 would still be a bright site, and would suit many plants. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,400
    And don't forget plants can't read.
    Over the years I have found many plants that do well, when according to received wisdom, they should fail.
    Did they tear it out with talons of steel
    And give you a shot, so that you wouldn't feel?
    And washed it away as if it wasn't real?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,145
    Indeed @punkdoc.
    I've had Hebes and Pyracanthas in positions where they had no sun - at any time of year, despite the info always saying full sun. They still thrived, and flowered   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


Sign In or Register to comment.