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Tin bath ideas

Hi, I am painting an old tin bath back to silver, it is quite large, similar to this one but the silver colour is now quite bright.  I want to plant it up so that it looks good all year, I particularly love white flowers. Not quite sure where to start, any recommendations would be much appreciated.  We are also toying with the idea of the possibility of planting most of it but also having a small water feature, maybe some kind of tap running water into it with a pump.  Has anybody done anything similar?  Thank you

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561
    Hard to see how it can be both water feature and planter as even bog plants need some  drainage so their roots don't drown so you will need holes to let excess water escape.

    I have a slightly smaller version I painted many years ago - Hammerite black with a  metallic fleck in it - and used to fill with ice to hold the beers at parties.   Nowadays I have it in my potting area, filled with water for dunking plants pre and post re-potting.

    I think you need to decide between plants or water and then proceed accordingly.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thanks, we were thinking more of planting up the bath and then having a pump and container within it amongst the flowers, too ambitious?

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561
    Complicated to keep the container and thus a pump clean I would think.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • just plants it is then, any advice on how we can make it look good all year so that even in winter it is still showing interest?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,095
    edited September 2020
    You need some evergreens, but also, it would be better to site it in the shade. That will heat up enormously in hot weather, which will be problematic for most plant roots. 
    However, the good thing is that white flowering plants are superb for shade, and there are plenty to choose from.  :)
    Hardy geraniums, Dicentra [which now has a new name I've forgotten] Japanese Anemones for this time of year, Hostas, Bergenias. All available in white, plus you get the variegated foliage with most hostas. Ferns - some are evergreen, the Aspleniums are readily available. Iberis [perennial candytuft] is good and trails over edges too. Euonymous would provide winter interest as a foliage plant too, as would Heucheras. 

    Narcissus, crocus and snowdrops for winter into spring, native primulas - all those are available as whites into pale creams. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561
    I agree with @Fairygirl - white flowering plants in some shade and maybe a trailing, creamy white variegated ivy too for winter interest.  There's a white flowering form of vinca that is not thuggish and white hardy cyclamen maight be good in there to extend the season.  Mine are flowering now.  Maybe a white penstemon for summer.

    As it's a small area, best to stick to a few plants rather than cram it with too many different ones.  It'll look more coherent.

    Make sure you have a good layer of gravel in the bottom with some charcoal to keep things sweet then put drainage holes and inch or two up the sides so there's always a water reservoir.  I'd also use a loam-based compost such as John Innes 3 mixed with up to 1.3rd of MPC to help hold some moisture and maybe some fine grit mixed in too depending on your choice of plants.    
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Wow thank you so much , excellent suggestions, I am really looking forward to filling it now, drainage holes on the sides and gravel in the bottom isnt something I would have thought of.  Thanks again
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,095
    edited September 2020
    Oh yes - those little ivies are excellent for tucking in on edges. I have one in a tiny pot on the shelf by my back door, and it fills a gap between other plants. No attention needed either. White cyclamen definitely. I also have a prostrate Gaultheria, which is very good in shade.

    There's a good nursery which specialises in plants for shade too, hence their name  ;)

    https://www.plantsforshade.co.uk/
    Worth taking a look for further ideas  :)

    We forgot about white Hellebores too. Excellent and evergreen. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • After much thought I think I would like to go with evergreen Iberis and ivy trailing over the sides.  I really think that would look lovely as a starting point.  I have some white cyclamen which I would like to put in now along with some japanese anemones which I also already have to give it height (coincidentally my mother has loads of these to get rid of, could I transplant them now?).  I want to get the bulbs in first so that I get a lovely spring show, I was thinking snowdrops and pale pink tulips. Will the cyclamen last until the spring bulbs come out?  If not I can add some winter pansies maybe. The thing that really confuses me is this - once the cyclamen and anemones have died down and the spring bulbs come up and they too have died, how do I add in summer flowers without disturbing the outgoing flowers/bulbs?  Is a year round display possible or would you usually just concentrate on getting say winter and spring looking good?  Its giving me a lot to think about, I cant wait to get planting!  Thanks so much
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