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Does Blight stay in soil?

Have also posted in problem solving but thought this might be a better forum for the problem? We have recently filled in an old pond and are intending to move our rose bed into the site in the autumn. Meanwhile we used the site as an overspill for our tomatoes during the summer. However, they have fallen to tomato blight this week which has wiped out the entire crop.  My question is, is the site safe to still plant roses into in the autumn as I understand they can suffer from blight as well. Any help appreciated as am a complete novice to this.

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,519
    Hi @julietaylor101 and welcome aboard  :)

    Don't worry too much about where you post a query ... we'll find it ... most of us go to 'Recent Discussions' where all the new posts appear  :)

    Anyway ... the blights that tomatoes get  are diseases that affect members of the Solanum family (tomatoes and potatoes amongst others) so roses won't be affected.  B)

    And while we're on the subject, the spores that spread Early and Late Blight are airborn (you can get email alerts earlier in the season, notifying you if it's in your area) ... whilst it's good garden hygiene to clear up and burn fallen leaves etc from blight affected plants as well as the plants themselves, rather than compost them, what usually happens is that any spores on the soil surface are dealt with by winter frosts etc.  

    Hope that helps.  :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Thank you for that - sounds promising🤞 I didnt want to go to all the effort if moving the roses only to lose them later on
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 64,519
     :) 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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