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Citrus growers I need some help!

herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
I recently had a crazy Covid moment and bought a lemon and orange tree, I have no idea what I am doing but am determined not to kill them this year.  They are alleged to be 3-4' high in 6.5L pots and hardy down to 5C.

I have a couple of pressing questions:
I am concerned that the pots sound a bit small for the trees so how soon should I think of re-potting them (if at all) and what size pot would be sensible?

It is unlikely I can get any JI2 in the near future so would a mixture of garden soil, mpc, grit, vermiculite and sand be suitable?

I have reprimanded myself severely for this moment of madness but would really appreciate any help since what is done is done 

Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,040
    Don't panic.  They are lovely plants.  As they won't be hardy outdoors in winter but do enjoy being outside in the sun in summer I suggest you go for larger plastic pots which are easier to move in and out and John Innes no 3 compost with annual top dressing and fertiliser for citrus plants.   

    Have a read of this - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/citrus 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
    edited 31 July
    Thank you for those kind and calming words @Obelixx and for the link which I had already read along with a couple of others. None of them gave any clue as to the pot size needed but, instinctively, the 6.5L pots seem too small.  I have a couple of medium size plastic pots which I can use (the aubergines can go in an old compost bag) but no hope of any John Innes 2 which the RHS recommend.

    I guess I'l have to mix my own and hope.  I am hoping my unheated greenhouse will be enough (with added bubble wrap) to see them through the winter. The citrus food should be coming with the trees.
    Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,040
    There is no such thing as John Innes no 2 here so mine - Meyer lemon and a limquat - are just in one that's recommended for flowering plants and pelargoniums here.  Not loamy at all but they do produce flowers and fruit OK.   

    They get citrus fertiliser and I've also given them some slow release tomato fertiliser this summer and, so far, flowering and pollinating are going well and I have small fruits forming on both.   I have their pots in saucers so the water doesn't just run thru and I can see when the saucers are bone dry and give them more water but I do have them sat on the steps at the front of the house, full south and 40C these last few days so they get thirsty.

    I also have a young yuzu which is yet to flower and, I have discovered, prefers ericaceous compost so next time I'm buying compost I'll get some and re-pot it.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
    Thank you again @Obelixx they are arriving today and I no longer feel like I'm stepping off a cliff!  Good idea with the saucers and they will have to put up with tap water for now.  Sometimes things loom when you are cut off from 'normal' life and become problems, silly but there it is, hoping I can enjoy my new fruit trees now.
    Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy
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