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Grass ID please

LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,911
Hello. This is for sale at my local honesty shop and would fill a space nicely, but I'm always nervous about identifying grasses because there are so many and some are so similar to others! It has an abrasive feel, so I was thinking Carex, but I also wondered about Uncinia (also a sedge, I think? Not sure what it feels like). Any ideas or advice? Thanks in advance.

'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
- Cicero

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 8,695
    It does not look like my Uncina, but it does look like a Carex, sadly I don't think that is diagnostic.
    Walk out to winter, swear I'll be there.
    Chill will wake you, high and dry
    You'll wonder why.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,207
    Carex Buchanii  was my first thought
    Devon.
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,911
    edited July 2020
    Yes, photos of C. buchananii do look very close, so I think I'm going to go with that assumption unless it does something to make me doubt it! Thanks both. The leaf ends don't seem so wispy as most photos would have it, but we'll see (I was out buying it when you responded). Any care tips / warnings, from your experience? There were several there, which always worries me slightly as it probably means someone's got too many and needs to offload some...
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 3,168
    The moors round here are covered with stuff that looks just like that!
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 2,967
    edited July 2020
    I had one of these ever-brown Carex for several years, it was a good plant. It steadily gets bigger so eventually you'll want to divide it (probably where these little plants came from). I ended up with three. Never seeded for me, coped with sunny dry conditions very well. It always looked pretty much the same all year round, which is good in a way, but I got a bit bored with it in the end. 
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,911
    Thanks for that.  I can see that it could get boring! I'm just looking to use it as a textural filler, rather than a specimen plant. I deliberately chose the pig that looked like it would need dividing, so I may already have several plants... 
    When you tired of it, did you have any trouble getting rid of it? Glad it can cope with sunny and dry - I have more of that than I want!
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 2,911
    ^ pot, not pig! 
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • SuesynSuesyn South Somerset Posts: 321
    Mine has seeded itself but is easy to dig up. It has even grown in the cracks in the paving, always the sign of a vigorous plant in my book. The only problem l've found is that it tends to get quite long and can be a bit of a trip hazard if it's too near the path. Spring is the best time for dividing or moving them. 
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