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Sempervivum

loesbobloesbob Posts: 20
Hi All,

For once not a problem but have a look at the picture and tell me if this is normal.  First time I have grown sempervivum.  It has been in a very sunny place outside since lock down and I have only had it less than a year.

Cheers  Bob
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Posts

  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 1,731
    edited July 2020
    Its a flower bending towards the light. Totally normal. The rosette It grows from will die off when the flower dies.
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,168
    I'm assuming you took it indoors just to photograph.  In my experience they never do well as houseplants, they are always better left outdoors all year round (as long as there is very, very good drainage).  
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520
    It's a nice one too  :)
    I can even grow them here no problem - I tip the pots on their side slightly to help with drainage. Mine grow in just grit with very little soil mixed in. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 563
    I grow mine on an ancient sink. To give some height I have screwed up chicken wire as a base. The 'compost' is mainly horticultural grit. My grandma used to throw bits onto the outside toilet roof where they grew without any soil or care! I prefer my cream flowed ones to the pink ones. 
  • loesbobloesbob Posts: 20
    I thought I had made a gritty mix but from what you are all saying I should make it even more so.  Is it unusual for them to flower?
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 563
    It's not unusual for them to flower but I wish mine didn't! The rosette dies once it has flowered and if there are too many the plants look untidy and take quite a long time to grow off shoots to fill the gaps. I asked a specialist at the Harrogate flower show what to do and was told to take the flowering rosettes off. I sometimes remove the whole plant and then replace with a new one, grown from old plants. They are very easy to propagate,  just stick a single rosette in some gritty compost.
  • gjautosgjautos BuckinghamshirePosts: 174
    Sorry to hijack someone else's thread. I've seen some lovely varieties of these in my local GC. I always assumed they aren't hardy enough to be kept outside all year. Am i wrong here? Would be great if i was as i have nowhere to store them over winter.
  • If you don't want them to flower then keep them well watered and fed. They flower more if they are in fear for their lives!
  • gjautos said:
    Sorry to hijack someone else's thread. I've seen some lovely varieties of these in my local GC. I always assumed they aren't hardy enough to be kept outside all year. Am i wrong here? Would be great if i was as i have nowhere to store them over winter.
    They normally live in the mountains so they are very cold-hardy. Mine live outside perfectly happily with no protection. 
  • gjautosgjautos BuckinghamshirePosts: 174
    Thanks @Alan Clark2 in Liverpool
    I feel a visit to the GC coming!
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