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Can someone tell me why my home grown potatoes always disintegrate when I boil them? I have this proble every year.
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  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
    Different varieties have different properties christinejj77, which variety are you growing?
    Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,040
    If you are growing salad potatoes they become floury if left to grow too big or else not adequately watered.   
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • The variety is Constance Second Early and they were planted in early April. I have the same problem every year, whichever variety I use, so am wondering if the problem is to do with the soil.
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
    As Obelixx says the watering is very important and so is fertile, water retentive soil. Do you grow in the ground or in containers? Container grown potatoes need a lot more attention and plenty of water. If the soil is well prepared that is unlikely to be a problem.
    Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy
  • Someone told me to microwave ones when I had this problem and I never boil potatoes ever now as the result was so good! Just pop in with small splash of water in microwave pot with lid with steam hole and perfect every time and really quick. My microwave has a potato setting for boiled but if not check manual. Hope this helps!
  • herbaceous - these are grown in the ground. I've tried to make sure they haven't dried out this year.
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 1,844
    I'm not sure what else you can do then christinejj77 except experimenting with different varieties.

    Potatoes can exhibit quite different properties in different parts of the country, I know I tried a dozen varieties before I settled on King Edward (I like fluffy mash and roast potatoes).  I just follow my Dad's advice, dig a deep trench, chuck in lots of green stuff (mostly Comfrey in my case) and good compost and plant a spit deep and well apart.

    I really hope you find a solution or someone can offer alternative suggestions  :) 
    Haven't been anywhere for over four months but I'm here and I'm mostly happy
  • pinutpinut Posts: 21
    Try toughening-up the tubers before harvesting.

    Normally, you would wait until the foilage dies off naturally and then leave the tubers in the ground for two weeks more before digging them up.

    The extra time spent under the soil toughens up the skins of the tubers making them less likely to be damaged during harvesting, and I suppose during cooking too.

    Cut off the foilage and then wait the two weeks if you intend to harvest before the foilage dies off naturally.

  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 1,183
    Do they have the same texture when steamed? Boiling takes away too much goodness anyway. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 21,040
    You could also try roasting them Italian fashion.  Just clean off the muck but leave skins on.  Cut them into chunks, add some chopped rosemary and garlic and a tablespoon of olive oil and stir well then tip into a roasting tray, season with salt and pepper and roast at 220C/200C fan till they go golden and have crispy bits.  Cooking time depends on size of chunks.   Easy and yummy.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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