Forum home Plants

Plant ID Challenge - how many can you name?

adjsandersadjsanders Posts: 19
Hi expert gardeners!

I really love the planting scheme in the photo below and would love to replicate it (or as close as possible) in my own garden. But I am far too novice of a gardener to be able to identify any of the plants!

I realise the photo isn't the best, but wondered if anyone could have a go at naming some fo the plants?

TIA!



«1

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,602
    platycerium bifurcatum
    Devon.
  • PianoplayerPianoplayer Posts: 597
    Magnolia lurking at the back lefthand side?
  • adjsandersadjsanders Posts: 19
    Aha! Magnolia was one of my suspicions, @Pianoplayer

    Any idea which one? Grandiflora perhaps? I would have expected it to be more green but it may just be the lighting in the photo?
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797
    If it's on Pinterest, the source might be a clue. Can you link to it?
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,797
    edited July 2020
    The strappy leaves under the window could be Iris foetidissima.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 3,997
    Impossible to say for sure from the photo, especially not knowing where and when it was taken and whether it is fully enclosed or not.
    What you could do is look for things that give a similar effect, so that you could select to suit your garden and your preferences.
    So from front right : small green bushy things. Sarcococca, can be clipped if needed. Lavender (ditto) , rosemary, thymes,  maybe some heathers, even African marigolds in summer.
    Next, long leaves. These look to be in pots, so its up to you and whether you can provide winter protection. Agapanthus can be evergreen or deciduous, but the evergreen ones are tender and need to be inside in winter and as  they are from South Africa even the others need a thick mulch and a milder climate.
    Loads of bulbs have long leaves, so you could ring the changes through the seasons.  There are perennials too, such as crocosmias (choose a nice variety, not the common orange one which is a thug!), Hemerocallis and Libertias. There are also grasses and sedges which could give a similar effect and some of these are evergreen too.
    A cordyline or tall lilies might serve the turn of the tall plant at the end and beyond that is a tall, thin tree or maybe a climber, so an Italian cypress or a choice from hundreds of suitable clematis perhaps.
    Same process on the left hand side, if you can identify what you like about it.
    All much more fun than a list of someone else's plants :)
  • PianoplayerPianoplayer Posts: 597
    I'm not expert enough to identify the type, I'm afraid! Looks quite large...
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,893
    Stag Horn fern on the wall, my mum had a huge one.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • adjsandersadjsanders Posts: 19
    edited July 2020
    Has anyone ever told you you're a genius @LG_ ?

    I had actually tried that earlier but the pin linked to a dodgy site. I then remembered that that usually means there is another pin exactly the same that links to the right site.

    I managed to find the right pin, with the right link and LOTS more photos - https://www.adamrobinsondesign.com/landscape-design-stanmore

    Magnolia, Draceana and Cordyline are mentioned. But I wondered if anyone can ID any more?

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,602
    Hostafan1 said:
    platycerium bifurcatum
    Lyn said:
    Stag Horn fern on the wall, my mum had a huge one.
    Snap

    Devon.
Sign In or Register to comment.