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Garden Design

Hi all

We have recently moved into a new build property and going to be having the Garden landscaped next month. 

These are our current plans (yes that's my child like drawing haha).

Getting the garden done doesn't come cheap so just want to make sure we are doing the right thing and that we haven't missed an opportunity for something we haven't thought of. 

Would love people's idea,  as you can see it isn't a very big garden sadly so want to make the most of it.  

The boarders would be double height sleepers and sadly the grass will be AstroTurf as the drainage is so poor around here (don't worry we have a load to cut to the side of the house lol)

Thanks all
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,579
    You don't show north or indicate what kind of soil you have or what you will use to fill the raised beds.   All of those factors will dictate what you can grow.

    I'd rather work on fixing the drainage or making a good porous surface that's attractive than go with plastic grass because it will have to have very good ground prep to get it right and will need constant cleaning to keep it looking good.   

    I suggest you go onto Pinterest and look at small garden designs to see what can be done with a bit of imagination.   Then make a list of things you want to be able to do in your garden including space for play for any children or pets, entertaining, fruit and veg and/or herbs, things you absolutely need such as a space for storing tools and equipment, recycling bins, washing line or whirlygig etc.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Bee witchedBee witched Scottish BordersPosts: 880
    Hello @ccfc999,

    If that was my garden then I'd leave the path where it is. I would improve the soil between the path and the fence and consider growing some climbers up and along the fence to soften it.
    It rather dominates the garden at the moment .... and will do on your current plan. If you are concerned that you need access to the fence to maintain it, then there are lots of climbing plants that are cut down low each year  ... so not really an issue.

    I agree with @Obelixx about the idea of astroturf. If you don't sort out the drainage then you'll just end up with soggy astroturf ... not a good look  .

    Might also be nice to break up the expanse of wall at the rear of the garden .... maybe some lovely wall pots ... or some tallish shrubs in the border there.

    Good luck with your project.

    Bee x
     image

    Bees must gather nectar from two million flowers to make one pound of honey   
  • ccfc999ccfc999 Posts: 22
    We have a very hard clay surface. 

    The borders will be filled with multi purpose soil but not to concerned on what to grow in the borders at this stage just want to get the lay out right.

    We will have a small shed for things like a lawn mower and general gardening tools in the bottom right of the picture.  We have a retractable line already in place and recycling bags etc will be in land to the side of the house so got those covered. 

    The grass/astro has been a annoyance for us.  We have never liked AstroTurf but few have been able to grow decent grass on this estate which is old dockland.   They will do drainage for astro turf so won't be flooded. 

    We have quite a few pots to come which will go down the side of the path as the path will be quite wide


    Thank you both for your thoughts it really helps
  • The existing path and patio look to be in great condition, surely they’re brand new if it’s a new build, I’d keep them, seems silly to spend out a lot of money moving a path a few foot to the right. Paint the fence, and have a nice planted border along it. Do you definitely need grass at all, whether real or artificial? 

    But yeah, get the drainage sorted first before you spend lots. If it’s brand new the developer should sort it out for you if you snag it to them. 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,249
    From your photo, the bed is in fairly deep shade, which will affect what you can grow.
    This is why you need to think about orientation [ N and S ] of the garden.
    It may be more sensible to have the bed on the other side of the garden.
    To my mind, the path is too wide.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • ccfc999ccfc999 Posts: 22
    The existing path and patio look to be in great condition, surely they’re brand new if it’s a new build, I’d keep them, seems silly to spend out a lot of money moving a path a few foot to the right. Paint the fence, and have a nice planted border along it. Do you definitely need grass at all, whether real or artificial? 

    But yeah, get the drainage sorted first before you spend lots. If it’s brand new the developer should sort it out for you if you snag it to them. 
    Thank you,  yes they are new just not to our taste.  They will be recycled though as lots of people on the estate want to extend there patio and have the same slabs. 

    Good point about the grass, I think it might just break it up a bit. 

    We were discussing fence paint today and just couldn't decide what colour, we seem to over think it a lot :) 
  • Fence colour is personal but for me I think a darker colour, so it fades into the background and greenery stands out in front of it. Black is quite overdone now though. I’m considering dark/cobalt blue or dark amethyst for our new garden. 

    Again personal opinion but unless you have to have grass whether real/artificial - say children or pets need to use it - especially in a small space, why have it. Even if it’s real it’s an ecological desert. If you don’t have grass then you have more space for planting :-) perhaps with stepping stones winding through it, an arbour type seat agains the wall, or space for some water. 
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 2,112
    What do you want from the garden? That's the most important question.
    Personally, I think that what you want to do is what 99% of people do. Borders are too narrow. Planting opportunities missed. It doesn't use the potential of the space. It doesn't have any character. But if it is what you want, go for it.
    If you want to have a normal garden, you are doing the right thing. If you want to have an exceptional designer garden for others to envy you, this is not the way how to do it. If you want a functional and usable garden, the whole design depends on the intended use.
    Personally, I wouldn't spend any money on your design. You can have a much nicer garden much cheaper because you already have the hard landscaping there. It really just need some bags of compost and well-chosen plants (which can be expensive or not, depending on your budget).
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,579
    Multi-purpose compost is horrid!  Poor in nutrient and very claggy with poor drainage.  You'll be forever working it to add nutrients and texture and keep it watered but not sodden.

    Leave the path where it is.   Work skip loads of well rotted manure and compost into the border between it and the fence.  Cover the fence with tensioned; horizontal wires at 30cm/12" intervals and plant some repeat flowering rambling roses and/or clematis group 3 for a long season of interest that will disguise the expanse of fence.   Fill the rest of the bed with suitable bulbs, perennials and shrubs for year round interest.   

    For the rest of the space, muscle power.   Like decorating, it's all about the preparation.    Fork over the entire area and remove crud.   Use a good garden fork to pierce the subsoil below the good stuff and layer on well composted manure and garden compost. Leave it over winter for the worms to work in.   

    Then, in April, and after some more prep work you can sow a proper grass lawn if that's what you want or level a central area and cover it with a weed membrane and then a mulch of slate chippings, gravel or chipped bark according to preference.   You could also use hoggin - a permeable mix of sand, gravel and clay which is stamped down to make a level surface.   

    A decent wide bed along that wall could, depending on aspect and soil prep, be used to grow all sorts of plants but that depends on the basic nature of your soil and the direction/aspect it faces.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,586
    I agree about the grass/astroturf, if you don't need it l wouldn't bother in such a small area. 
    That wall could be a real feature and add character as so many gardens are surrounded by fences on all sides.
    The idea of looking at sites such as Pinterest is a good one, but you may find it overwhelming ! It will definitely give you ideas though. 
    You could off set the path slightly so that it doesn't go directly like an arrow to the gate (nothing too much, you don't want to go on an expedition ). 
    I understand why you have the patio there (l'm assuming that access is straight out of the back door) and it's a sunny area, but there's a lot of sun along the fence line. If that gets sun early or at the end of the day, you may want to consider a seating area there for morning coffee, or evening glass of wine or soft drink  :)

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