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Rootgrow or bone meal and mulch

Hi there I’m going to be planting a hydrangea paniculata sundae fraise and a beef eater lupin what would be better to use root grow or bone meal I have both also goibg to be mulching the border with Westland chip and bark I’ve never done this before I’m i right in thinking. I do not put the mulch around the roots of the plants and leave a circle around them. Many thanks for any help 
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  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,648
    Those two don't need Rootgrow, so just a handful of bonemeal will do in the bottom of the hole and forked in. You are absolutely right in thinking you leave a circle around the main stems of the plant. You will need to water them in well and then put the mulch on.
  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 122
    Ok thank you so much and when planting I take it the grown has to be same level as the soil. And I know now how to water as that was my first post water once weekly thank you for getting back to me 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,190
    You'll need to water the hydrangea far more often than that. 
    Unless you live in a very wet area like I do.

    It's vital that plants are thoroughly watered at this time of year until established, and particularly shrubs.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 122
    Ok thank you fairy girl how much should I be watering it once planted say a cup of water eod or ed 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,190
    Your post isn't clear.
    Depending on the size of the plant, it'll need a watering canful to a bucketful every couple of days. A hydrangea in a 7 or 8 inch pot [which would be fairly standard] would certainly need at least a canful on a regular basis to settle it in and get roots down properly. In less moisture retentive soil, or in dry spells, they'll need more. Bigger specimens would also need more. 

    Lupins wouldn't need so much, especially if they're small plants - ie in 4 inch pots or similar, but they need watered well until new growth is appearing, and then watered if there are long dry spells. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 122

  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 122
    Ok sorry my bad there both in 3 litre pots sorry I should have stated that you can see from the picture they’re quite big already 
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,629
    Make sure they're well-soaked before you plant them - dunk the whole pot in a bucket of water and hold it under until bubbles stop rising, then take it out and allow the excess to drain. Then water plenty and regularly as @Fairygirl said. A cupful is nothing to a plant of that size, we're talking a full can at a time. The hydrangea in particular has a lot of growing to do. The lupin is herbaceous and will die back to nothing for the winter, and their leaves usually get tatty after the flowers are finished so don't worry if that happens.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,190
    They'll both need plenty of water, but shrubs in particular must be watered thoroughly and regularly in summer.
    At this time of year, ground dries out quickly, which is bad news for plants that have just been put in. Cooler damper weather makes it easier, so it depends on your conditions and climate. 
     
    Rain isn't enough to do the job, unless it's persistent for several hours or more.   :)
     

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LeeendeanLeeendean Posts: 122
    Ok well I’m in Essex and it’s warm now I’ll definitely keep on top of that.would every day watering be ok,and sorry to keep asking guys I’ve only just took up gardening it’s so confusing when you look on the net Thank you both for all your help I’ve just checked the Weather for next week it’s 21 degrees pretty much all week 
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