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Risk of over scarifying in heavily moss infested lawn

darraghmcgeowndarraghmcgeown Posts: 3
edited July 2020 in Problem solving
Hi, I have recently begun the process of acquiring the tools and materials to renovate my front lawn which is seriously infested with moss. I did one or two test patches with my moss rake and was basically left with no grass. It’s basically impossible to lightly scarify as it pulls out like a carpet and seems to be completely detached from the soil below.

My plan was to scarify and remove all moss/thatch then top dress with top soil, grass seed and marathon lawn fertiliser. However, given the state of my test patches I’m concerned I’m about to destroy my lawn. Is it safe/advisable to do this heavy scarification in early August. Please advise 

Ive attached a photo of my test patch.

Posts

  • Dave HumbyDave Humby HampshirePosts: 1,130
    edited July 2020
    Generally I would do significant lawn works in the spring or late summer / early autumn when you have optimum growing and recovery times. Now is a challenge, mostly due to water but if you are happy to help the 'lawn' recover then it can be done now. What you really need to address is why you have so much moss rather than just the symptom. If you don't address the root cause you'll be back to square one in no time at all and it will be a lot of effort for not a great return. Damp and shade are the two main contributors to moss so you need to look at those and whether they can be improved ie address compaction and / or add drainage and increase light and wind to the lawn. 
  • Generally I would do significant lawn works in the spring or late summer / early autumn when you have optimum growing and recovery times. Now is a challenge, mostly due to water but if you are happy to help the 'lawn' recover then it can be done now. What you really need to address is why you have so much moss rather than just the symptom. If you don't address the root cause you'll be back to square one in no time at all and it will be a lot of effort for not a great return. Damp and shade are the two main contributors to moss so you need to look at those and whether they can be improved ie address compaction and / or add drainage and increase light and wind to the lawn. 
    Hi Dave, thanks for the reply. It’s not a shade problem and the garden is sloped on a hill and appears to be a sandy soil compared with my clay back garden so I’m not sure a it’s drainage either. Could it just be years of neglect? We have on recently purchased the house so we have no ideal what maintenance if any has occurred in the past. 

    I’m hoping to control the moss by aerating the lawn next spring and starting to apply a seasonal dose of Evergreen 4 in 1.

    Thanks for the advice. 
  • Dave HumbyDave Humby HampshirePosts: 1,130
    Good luck with your new project and new house Darragh. Be careful with Evergreen 4 and 1 and make sure you read the instructions and apply to the letter as it is very easy to over apply or apply in the wrong conditions leading to damage (burning) of the lawn. I don't like the product myself as I feel the operating window is too narrow and there are many a thread on here of sorry tales relating to it's use. 
  • Thanks Dave. What would suggest as an alternative?
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