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A question about Red Clover

madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
edited July 2020 in Wildlife gardening
I have some Red Clover growing in my 'Meadow Lawn'.Not sure if this is from a plug or seeds that I planted a couple of years ago or something that has just turned up.
3 months with no rain has taken its toll.The Red Clover has not been cut at all.
I really want to be able to mow the lawn so everything is roughly the same height.
My question is:-If the clover is cut down and eventually mown will it spread like its White counterpart or is this a variety one that always grow tall like this?

“Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,496
    Red clover is taller than the white lawn clover. 
    Could you leave a taller strip along the side there?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
    All the Red Clover I see round here on lawns is the same height as the white!
    (I must get some photos).
    This is supposed to be a taller strip along that edge of the lawn which is why I let it grow but with the winds and no rain it just looks a mess.
    The edge is on a slight slope so I may be putting some edging bricks in to stop the soil disappearing onto the road so I may have to transplant it.
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,450
    It's usually much taller then the white clover, as @Dovefromabove says. In wetter climates, it's quite upright, so it may just be floppy because it's been drier.

    I find it doesn't spread as readily as the white. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,496
    Grows up to 40cm tall

    https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/wildlife-explorer/wildflowers/red-clover

    it used to be sown as a cover crop and then cut and baled for hay ... it has to be a reasonable length for that. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,174
    are both red and white as good for pollinators? I see red clover promoted more readily for this...
  • OwlbearOwlbear Posts: 49
    edited July 2020
    As I understand it, both are good for pollinators, but they attract or are favoured by different ones, with Red Clover attracting the longer tongued Bumblebees, while White Clover is a little more accessible for shorter tongued Bumblebees and Honey Bees .
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,174
    Owlbear said:
    As I understand it, both are good for pollinators, but they attract or are favoured by different ones, with Red Clover attracting the longer tongued Bumblebees, while White Clover is a little more accessible for shorter tongued Bumblebees and Honey Bees .

    Fab. Thanks @Owlbear . It sounds good, then, to plant a mix.... ?
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
    Took some photos of some Red Clover today (also White Clover and Bird's Foot Trefoil) on a regularly mown bank at a nearby trading estate.
    The Red is more prominent than the White which seems to creep more.
    The Red Clover also seems to vary in colour from light to quite dark.
    This bank is the sort of look I am hoping for with my 'Meadow Lawn'!




    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
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