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Pheasants

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 66,205
    It is a job ... it’s part of farming ... it adds to the income of the farm. 
    Why kill something?  So someone can eat it. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • KiliKili Posts: 481
    As I see it unless there is a need to quell an overpopulation or disease in Pheasants or any other animal for that matter (I'll exclude the human species) there is simply no reason for shooting them that I can see. To do so for any other reason is inexcusable and dressing it up any other way is simply an excuse to take pleasure in killing a lower life form incapable of defending itself.

    Are we really the most intelligent species on this planet?

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • dave125dave125 Posts: 159
    edited July 2020
    I wasn't going to wade in but the last poster used the word "inexcusable"
    I grew up in the 70's, we were poor and the only occasions on which we ate well was when my Dad or myself shot a Pheasant, Woodpigeon or Rabbit. I was an excellent shot with a 12 bore at age 6 and yes today I would never hurt anything but you're saying subsistence shooting is inexcusable - you've had it way too easy
    Dave
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 2,286
    I don't think anyone objected to subsistence shooting. It was killing for pleasure. And while  I respect Dove's view  I feel it's a change of direction in the argument.  If a farmer arranges a shoot and it goes well, it is indeed a job well done. But killing the birds is not a job. The shooters are there for leisure, not work. Perhaps they could be encouraged to shoot with a camera, like in Africa. That really WOULD be a good job.
  • dave125dave125 Posts: 159
    20 or so years ago there was a nationwide cull, ie the complete destruction of a species by shooting within the UK. Some 100,000 Ruddy Duck were eliminated in 10 years for a "conservation" reason.
    This sickened me and I was very much involved in the area of conservation etc. I dropped out completely.
    How many people that are criticising hobby or leisure shooting, which does more for conservation than any cull, supported the Ruddy Duck eradication.
    Dave
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 66,205
    edited July 2020
    Down in Cornwall there are boats that take holidaymakers out on mackerel fishing trips. The customers who pay for the trip have a hopefully nice trip out on the boat and catch some fish ... they may take some home for supper ... the rest the boat-owner keeps to sell or use as lobster bait. 
    The holidaymakers enjoy themselves and the fish get caught. 
    What’s the difference between that and a pheasant shoot?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 2,286
    On dear! I don't really like fishing either, Dove. I know, I know! I'll be the only one in the world. I just dislike the whole thing where someone kills something as part of the entertainment. I haven't heard of the ducks, Dave, but I'm unsure about shooting and conservation. I thought gamekeepers were believed to be killing off all sorts to preserve grouse.
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Greater ManchesterPosts: 649
    Down in Cornwall there are boats that take holidaymakers out on mackerel fishing trips. The customers who pay for the trip have a hopefully nice trip out on the boat and catch some fish ... they may take some home for supper ... the rest the boat-owner keeps to sell or use as lobster bait. 
    The holidaymakers enjoy themselves and the fish get caught. 
    What’s the difference between that and a pheasant shoot?


    None.  That's killing for fun too. 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 66,205
    edited July 2020
    If folk won’t try to  understand the difference between pleasure/pride in doing something well and ‘fun’ then I’m going to withdraw from this thread. My forehead is getting bruised. 😉 
    Carry on without me folks. 




    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,627
    I saw a letter in BBC Wildlife Magazine a couple of months ago by a lady who was appalled by the idea of killing anything even for conservation reasons. She asked why American Mink aren't just trapped and released into a nice big enclosure where they could do no harm and can live out their lives naturally. It's estimated there are around 100,000 mink in the UK which would be an interesting number to keep securely housed together, never mind the costs of trapping, neutering and feeding. She's was also obviously happy for native wildlife and farm animals to die to feed them though. Soft hearted people are to be treasured but sadly the world just doesn't work that way.
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