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Climbing rose regeneration


Hi folks

I have a climbing rose (sorry, can't recall the variety) that was planted about 6 years ago. The first couple of years it out on lots of growth but didn't flower. It was also prone to powdery mildew the first 2 or 3 years however that has not been a problem the last couple of years. In the 3rd year it flowered really well however the last 2 years it has only had a handful of flowers at the top.

I have kept it well watered and fed twice a year. I have also attempted to prune it each year. 

I suspect the problem is how it has been trained and pruned and am just looking for suggestions on how to go about rejuvenating it in the Autumn so. I understand from watching a couple of videos I need to stars from the bottom and work my way out and that I need to identify the main stens and fan these out from the bottom to allow the flowering shoots to develop. 

My main concern is how to do this now the rose is more nature and difficult to bend/shape. Also, how do I get more growth towards the center of the rose rather than it all taking place at the edges?

Hope this makes sense and thanks for any suggestions in advance!

Stephen. 

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,228
    hi and welcome to the forum. 
    You need to try and get the main stems to a more horizontal position. Ideally leave about 18"  / 0.5m between them. 
    Devon.
  • Hostafan1 said:
    hi and welcome to the forum. 
    You need to try and get the main stems to a more horizontal position. Ideally leave about 18"  / 0.5m between them. 
    Many thanks for taking the time to respond, it's much appreciated.

    I was going to try that however am worried that the centre of the rose is stillgstill to remain very bare as it is older wood and all the new growth is on the ends or coming from newer growth itself.

    I was wondering if I was to cut it right back to the bottom of the rose, effectively to start again, would it regrow again and I could then start the process from scratch? Or would it be best to try and work with what I have.

    Hope that isn't too stupid a question 🙄

    Thanks again

    Stephen
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,198
    Some climbing roses are quite vigorous and grow quickly. You may need to find out what you have otherwise, you may even be struggling to contain it in that space, which to me looks quite small. Also, if the area is semi shaded or not in full sun, some roses will not perform well, and you will see lack of leaves along the lower branches and lack of flowering too.

    Powdery Mildew can be an issue with roses that climb, especially if you have it planted very close to a wall or have a lot of competition at the base with other plants planted around. You may need to nourish the soil yearly to help feed the rose and keep on top of watering if there has been no rain for weeks.

    You can cut them right back and re-train it again. Many roses benefit from this. You can remove half the the lower stems and do the remaining next year. But certainly no harm in pruning everything back to start again.

  • Some climbing roses are quite vigorous and grow quickly. You may need to find out what you have otherwise, you may even be struggling to contain it in that space, which to me looks quite small. Also, if the area is semi shaded or not in full sun, some roses will not perform well, and you will see lack of leaves along the lower branches and lack of flowering too.

    Powdery Mildew can be an issue with roses that climb, especially if you have it planted very close to a wall or have a lot of competition at the base with other plants planted around. You may need to nourish the soil yearly to help feed the rose and keep on top of watering if there has been no rain for weeks.

    You can cut them right back and re-train it again. Many roses benefit from this. You can remove half the the lower stems and do the remaining next year. But certainly no harm in pruning everything back to start again.

    Thanks for taking the time to post, you have provided some useful food for thought. 

    I do have a note of the variety somewhere so will double check how big it grows. 

    I did consider that it perhaps was struggling in the space provided with all the other competition going on around it in the same space from other plants. Something I will certainly bear in mind.

    It's a South facing fence so should get enough sun. I have also been giving it rose food twice a year and keeping it well watered, as well as mulching it each year.

    I think I will probably cut it quite hard back and see if I can train it better next year. I may have to accept the space is too small for it but will see how things work out.

    Thanks again for your advice.

    Stephen
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