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Dragonfly emerging

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,947
    edited June 2020
    Oh dear. I was doing quite well with the article until I got to the bit which said “ I dissected the nymph”. 

    Why oh why must human beings feel the need to kill something in order to understand something?

    Personally, I would far rather stand in awe and admiration and ignorance than kill and add a scintilla of rather useless knowledge to my stock of useless things that I know.

    It is one reason why I have always avoided using drugs to treat any illness that may afflict me. I can’t bear the thought of my comfort being at the expense of other animals’ suffering.

    That’s just me. Very thin skinned when it comes to scientific “advancements”. And nearly all my relatives worked in scientific research. 🙁 Christmas dinner conversations were always a fraught time for me.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520
    Fantastic photos @micearguers. A real treat to be there when it happens  :)
    Great photo too @pansyface. Wonderful to be there at the perfect time. I've never been that lucky.

    We see plenty of the golden ringed ones up here, on the lower slopes of hills at this time of year. Sometimes it's hard to avoid them when clouds of them suddenly lift off  :)




    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FireFire LondonPosts: 7,636
    pansyface said:
     
    Why oh why must human beings feel the need to kill something in order to understand something?
    Because science, learning, understanding.

  • floraliesfloralies Haute-Garonne SW FrancePosts: 1,109
    When I was in the garden yesterday I saw a Damselfly, it flew past me in what i can only describe as a small wisp of silver and landed on the grass nearby. If only I had had my camera with me. It looked to me to be totally silver colour but having tried to find it in my books I haven't come up with a name. It was just so delicate.
  • NewBoy2NewBoy2 BristolPosts: 1,640
    This is why we garden and build ponds.

    I finished my pond on my allotment 8 days ago and added three starter plants on the Friday and on Sunday had 2 bright blue dragonflies buzzing about with another smaller one attacking them both.

    What is the saying........Build it and they will come !

    Someone said during this current situation that I was very " LUCKY " to have an allotment.

    No....I deserve the plot as i have bashed it about and cared for my bit of The Earth for 8 years now.

     
    Everyone is just trying to be Happy.
  • floraliesfloralies Haute-Garonne SW FrancePosts: 1,109
    Mean't to say what super pics of the dragonflies before I went off on a tangent. Thankyou.
  • micearguersmicearguers CambridgePosts: 466
    The dragonfly from the start of this thread is still sat on the same leaf, hasn't moved for 18 hours now. It's very windy, perhaps that's why it's not venturing out. It's also a bit in a shaded spot, so it's not getting much sun light. On the other hand it's sheltered from the wind. I hope it has a good reserve of energy from its nymph stage. This afternoon I may try to coax it if it hasn't moved, although I'll research first whether that's a terrifically bad idea. Oh the worries!
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,947
    Not ideal flying weather here. Cold and wet and windy. I can’t see any bees at all today. Not a day to begin your flying career. 

    Once out of the water and secured to a rock or plant, the nymph expands its thorax, causing the exoskeleton to split open. Slowly, the adult emerges from the cast skin (called the exuvia) and begins to expand its wings, a process that may take an hour to complete. The new adult will be weak and pale initially and only have limited flying ability. This is called a teneral adult. Teneral adults are more vulnerable to predators, as they have softer bodies and weaker muscles.

    Within a few days, the dragonfly or damselfly usually exhibits its full adult colors and gains the strong flying ability that is characteristic of odonates. Having reached sexual maturity, this new generation will start searching for mates and begin the life cycle again.

    Tomorrow looks like a better day for take off.


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FlyDragonFlyDragon Greater ManchesterPosts: 628
    NewBoy2 said:
    This is why we garden and build ponds.

    I finished my pond on my allotment 8 days ago and added three starter plants on the Friday and on Sunday had 2 bright blue dragonflies buzzing about with another smaller one attacking them both.

    What is the saying........Build it and they will come !

    Someone said during this current situation that I was very " LUCKY " to have an allotment.

    No....I deserve the plot as i have bashed it about and cared for my bit of The Earth for 8 years now.

     
    You can deserve something and still be lucky to have it.   That's how I feel about most of the things I have.  :)
  • roisin897roisin897 North EssexPosts: 31
    Fabulous! We have a large pond and have had four massive emperor dragonflies emerge this year. One was tootling around ovipositing today: they are HUGE, like a mini helicopter.

    Age doesn't make you forgetful. Having way too many stupid things to remember makes you forgetful.
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