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Identify Plant

maggiemew1maggiemew1 Posts: 35
Hello everyone,
I picked this plant up from the roadside . Can anyone identify this please?

Posts

  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,703
    Hmm!
    Do you mean you dug it up from beside the road to plant in your garden?

    The flowers are not open yet but it looks like Valeriana officinalis

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Valeriana+officinalis,&client=firefox-b-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj4pcjKkKTqAhWkolwKHYQyAAcQ_AUoAXoECBUQAw&biw=1920&bih=938
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • maggiemew1maggiemew1 Posts: 35
    Thank you Silver Surfer!
    Yes I pulled it from soft road margin. I love it!
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 1,626
    @maggiemew1  We all see plants in the wild that we fall in love with, but it's not considered good practice to dig them up to take home (and is possibly illegal).  This forum will help you to identify plants in the wild, and in some cases there will be nurseries and online specialists who can help you to source them properly.

    Many of us have wildflowers in our garden, and could possibly supply you with seed, via the Seed Swap.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,703
    edited June 2020
    Yes I pulled it from soft road margin. I love it!
    I feared you were going to say that.
    I am horrified...you do realise that is illegal?
    I loved this plant and used to see it in verges every year we came to Scotland on holiday.
    I wanted one.
    But rather than illegally digging it up I found a nursery that sold them and bought one.

    Presently RHS list 45 nurseries who sell it ...many are mail order...see below
     

    "Legislation under the Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) makes it illegal “to uproot any wild plant without permission from the landowner or occupier” in Britain. The term 'uproot' is defined as “to dig up or otherwise remove the plant from the land on which it is growing”.

    List of nurseries who sell it.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/Nurseries-Search-Result?query=18738
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 2,286
    Even the roadside is owned by somebody..

    This is the base legislation:

    Under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981, which covers Britain, it is illegal to uproot any wild plant without permission from the landowner or occupier. Uproot is defined as to dig up or otherwise remove the plant from the land on which it is growing, whether or not it actually has roots; and, for the purposes of the legislation, the term plant includes algae, lichens and fungi as well the true plants mosses, liverworts and vascular plants. Similar general protection is given to all plants in Northern Ireland, under the Wildlife (Northern Ireland) Order, 1985.
  • maggiemew1maggiemew1 Posts: 35
    Oh dear, I am overwhelmed with chagrin. 
     
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    So, if builders trash every wild plant on the site, they are in the clear because they have the landowner's permission; if I get there ahead of them and rescue a few primroses, I could be fined.
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