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Clematis

gavbrad79gavbrad79 Posts: 3
Hello,
I am a complete novis when it comes to anything green, so would really appreciate some help.
I recently (4 weeks ago) planted 2x Clematis in plant pots to climb trellis to my lean-to posts. One plant was rained on heavily by the leaking gutter during the recent heavy rains and hasn't really recovered (I've since moved the pots to a more sheltered position).
Also, both plants appear to have been eaten by something (please see photos). I have been regularly checking in the evenings but haven't seen anything and have put down slug pellets just in case.
I have been watering regularly and also liquid plant food once a week, but neither seem very healthy. 
Please see attached photos, the one with purple flowers is Vagabond and the other is Ooh La La, which was rained on heavily. The garden is east facing so gets some sun.
Any help would be appreciated. 
Thanks
Gavin
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Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,290
    You need to remove the green plastic ties, spread the shoots out and tie them into the trellis.
    It does look like slug or snail damage.
    Ensure they are very well watered, they hate being dry.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,593
    They'd be much happier in the ground rather in pots and will need bigger pots than those to thrive.

    Agree with @punkdoc about the rest.  Go out with a torch and dusk and pick off slugs an snails and get rid.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    Too many slug pellets just attracts them, so it's counter productive.
    I don't like the use of slate either, despite the fact that it's often recommended. It's just a hiding place for slugs. 
    I don't put anything on mine, but if I have them in pots, grit or fine gravel is better as a mulch. 
    I agree with the others re those ties etc, and watering. Use some soft twine/string to attach the stems to your trellis. The canes they come with are only there for support while they're in the pots for selling, and for transporting. The green tape is simply used to attach the stems to that cane for the same reason  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • gavbrad79gavbrad79 Posts: 3
    Ok thanks for the help. I think I will plant them into the ground and tie them into the trellis.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,593
    OK then.  When you do, drench the pots first so the roots are plump.  Dig the hole deeper than the pot and wider so yo can add plenty of organic matter to the soil as you backfill and also to allow you to plant your clems 4" deeper than they are in the pot.  This will help them produce more shoots and grow stronger roots.  

    Keep them watered as they settle down and until autumn rains come in and tie or twine the stems as laterally as you can as this encourages more flowers.



    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    The Ooh La La one is one of those small clematis, so it won't grow particularly big.
    I don't think The Vagabond is very large either, so make the most of the room you have to train them nicely.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • gavbrad79gavbrad79 Posts: 3
    I was hoping for them to grow up and across the lean-to roof, can they be trained to do this? @Fairygirl
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,593
    Unlikely.  The Vagabond only gets to about 2m - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=535 

    And Oh La La just 1m - http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=3372 

    You want something like Etoile Violette to get over a lean-to http://clematisontheweb.org/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=26  It's a very sturdy clematis but even so will take 2 or 3 years to settle in and get strong enough to go that far in one season.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • REMF33REMF33 Posts: 479
    Can I tag on here? On a bit of a whim I bought two boulevard clematis - Pauli and Acropolis. I intended to put them in pots. The biggest pots I have are only 38x35. Do I need to get bigger ones? (My husband is going to kill me...)
    Also can't easily source John Innes no 3. as recommended by the suplier (they said half and half 'ordinary' compost and that.) Am I doomed to failure?
    The plants arrived last week, so need to do something soon...
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,313
    Just put them in compost for now @REMF33 - they'll be fine.
    What size of pot you put them in just now, largely depends on what size of pot they're currently in.
    You can let them mature a bit more, before putting in their final pots anyway, so it won't matter if that's not until next year.  :)

    I see @Obelixx has replied to your query @gavbrad79. You need a sizeable clematis if it's to grow over something like a pergola or a structure of some kind. The ones you've chosen won't be big enough. The viticellas are perfect for that- most of which are flowering from around now until autumn. 
    E.Violette is an excellent choice, and very straightforward.  You can combine one of those with one of the ones you currently have. One at each side.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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