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Kilmarnock willow

I have had my willow for 14 years and I have pruned it successfully every year. Did exactly the same this year and the leaves came out but the majority of them have now turned brown. But not all of them and there seems to be growth on some of the branches. Very confused. Any thoughts or suggestions?

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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,030
    14 years is quite a long time as these things can be short lived and die suddenly.   I was given one years ago and was pleased but after a couple of years I found it very dull except for the 2 weeks it had catkins, over demanding of pruning (short stem, long branche) and greedy for space and water.   Relieved when it died.

    April and May were very dry this year so maybe it was stressed.  Being a willow they're not good at being dry.   If it does die, consider it an opportunity to plant something with a longer season of interest.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • ldrldr Hinckley, LeicsPosts: 9
    The planting of my 7' willow (destined for the side of the new pond) was delayed for several months; I kept it alive in it's pot until just a few weeks ago when almost overnight all the leaves turned brown.  It's now "in place" and some leaves are appearing and all the branches seem alive so I have my fingers crossed.  I suspect it simply got too hot in its pot (it was frequently watered) or maybe my tapwater wasn't doing it any favours.   I have another smaller one further down the garden which is perfectly green and healthy but hasn't put on an inch of growth since it was planted in the autumn.  Strange behaviour.   They've got until next year to behave, which I hope they do as they are perfect for the chosen spots - just maybe the chosen spots aren't perfect for them. 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,030
    They are willows so they need moisture all the time and, for their size, they have very dense foliage so double or even triple the amount of water you first thought of.

    They are also notoriously short-lived and very dull for 50 weeks of the year that they don't have fresh leaves and catkins.  That gives you a bit of time to find a more rewarding plant with a longer season of interest.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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